The Vaginismus Treatment Formula

Cure The Sexual Dysfunction Vaginismus

The Vaginismus Treatment Formula covers all of this, and a lot more. And when you read it, you'll be Blown Away with how simple it really is to cure Vaginismus. Here's just a taste of what you'll discover: The importance of understanding what Vaginismus really is. I'll tell you everything there is to know about Vaginismus. The 5 step process that you must follow in order to cure Vaginismus. There is a ton of inaccurate information out there on how to cure Vaginismus. I will tell you the truth on how to treat Vaginismus so you never have to wonder again! Commonly overlooked signs and symptoms of Vaginismus and how to detect them before they get worse. What the difference is between Primary Vaginimus and Secondary Vaginsmus and how it changes how you treat Vaginismus. The top 7 physical and non-physical causes of Vaginismus and how to figure out which one caused your Vaginismus. Where you must go to properly diagnose Vaginismus. 4 problems every woman has to face due to Vaginismus and how to treat them. How Vaginismus compares to other painful sexual disorders. 7 tips on how to communicate with your doctor about Vaginismus because he/she probably doesn't know what Vaginismus is. Everything you need to know to properly and quickly diagnose Vaginismus. How fear and anxiety tell the body to anticipate pain and therefore close off the vagina. I'll show you how to kill this fear and axiety forever so that you can enjoy sex. A step-by-step guide on how to properly get rid of vaginal pain by the use of vaginal dilators. I'll tell what type of dilators to use and when to use them. Continue reading...

Cure The Sexual Dysfunction Vaginismus Summary

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Treatment For Vaginismus

The above-described views and treatment models show that there is wide variation in the causal attributes of vaginismus and that this diagnostic variety leads to an even wider variety of therapeutic interventions. In itself this is not particularly surprising when we consider that in order to have sexual intercourse in a satisfactory manner, obviously apart from the physical conditions that have to be met, there must also be special knowledge, expertise, attitudes and, last but not least, emotional moods. All this is overruled by motivation Do I really want to These rates suggest that all treatment forms achieve results and as far as this aspect is concerned, they vary very little. This indicates a nonspecific treatment effect. In terms of attention, validation of her complaint, and the patient's feeling of control and competence, the active constituents seem to be effective on a meta level than on a content level. Cost effectiveness ratios of the diverse treatment forms then become...

Vaginismus

Vaginismus occurs when the muscles around the outer third of the vagina contract involuntarily when vaginal penetration is attempted during sexual intercourse. Vaginismus is a sexual disorder that is characterized by the outer third of the vaginal muscles tightening, often painfully. A woman with vaginismus does not willfully or intentionally contract her vaginal muscles. However, when the vagina is going to be penetrated, the muscles tighten spontaneously due to psychological or other reasons. Vaginismus can occur under different circumstances. It can begin the first time vaginal penetration is attempted. This is known as lifelong vaginismus. Alternately, vaginismus can begin after a period of normal sexual functioning. This is known as acquired-type vaginismus. For some women, vaginal tightening occurs in all situations where vaginal penetration is attempted (generalized type). For other women, it occurs in only one or a few situations, such as during a gynecological examination at...

What Does the Term Dyspareunia Mean

In 1874, Barnes (1) coined the term dyspareunia. He felt that it would be a convenient way of summarizing the different conditions underlying painful intercourse just as 'dyspepsia' is used to signify difficult or painful digestion, we want a word to express the condition of difficult or painful performance of the sexual function (p. 68). Although the usefulness of the term dyspepsia is a matter of some controversy (2), the diagnosis of dyspareunia has not been seriously challenged and is still used by all major classificatory systems, such as the DSM-IV-TR (3) and the ICD-10 (4). The lack of specificity of the word dyspareunia is evidenced by the growing number of overlapping terms (e.g., vul-vodynia, vulvar vestibulitis syndrome, dysesthetic vulvodynia, vestibulodynia) denoting presumed disease entities. The majority of these terms originate from a recent renewed interest in painful vulvar conditions. Even prior to this increased interest, the term dyspareunia was often used...

The Psychoanalytical View

Musaph defined vaginismus as a hysterical symptom, or a conversion symptom (18). In other words, a psychological complaint (anxiety) is changed into a physical symptom (a vaginistic reaction). According to Musaph, why some women are vaginistic whereas other are not depends on whether they have a primary disposition towards suppression as a defense mechanism this might be towards a disrupted mother-child relationship, or other stressful situations that occurred in the oral and oedipal phase of emotional development. Although psychoanalysis has paid a great deal of attention to the development of sexuality, very few analysts have written about treatment for vaginismus. Musaph distinguished between two forms of psychoanalytical therapy dynamic-oriented therapy and classical psychoanalysis. The dynamic-oriented therapy form is a method to heal the symptoms, that is, the aim of therapy is to cure the neurotic reaction, in this case the vaginistic reaction. Some analysts use other resources...

The Interactional View

The interactional view assumes that vaginistic complaints have a function in maintaining the balance between partners, or in the emotional functioning of the woman herself. In this sense, the complaint can form a solution There are very few authors who explain the phenomenon of vaginismus fully on the basis of this view. However, much of the literature mentions the behavior and the personality structure of the male partner. He comes forward as a low self-confidence, anxious, passive, dependent person who is afraid of failure and for whom sex is a loaded subject (27,38,39). The partners of vaginistic women are believed to often suffer from sexual problems themselves, such as impotence and premature ejaculation (29,35,39,40). Despite these problems, the couple usually look very harmonic on the outside. They give the impression of being very well suited (18,37). In a recent study, rates of parital discord were equal to the general population (3). It speaks for itself that within the...

The Sociocultural View

Sjenitzer believes that vaginismus is caused by the social position of women in our society and their dissatisfaction with their role (41). According to this author, vaginismus is a protest against the patriarchal norms that reduce women to either a lust object or a mother. In addition, she makes a stand against sexist ideas in the treatment of vaginismus, particularly against placing coitus in the central position in the sexual relationship. The feminist view states clearly that women often seek something in sexuality that is completely different from what men seek. In women, the experience of emotional intimacy is generally a prerequisite for them to enjoy sex. Bezemer developed group therapy for women with vaginistic complaints (42). At the same time, group therapy was organized for the male partners of these patients, led by male therapists. The aim of this therapy was to restore the woman's power over her body and her physical reactions. Thus, a therapy aim such as coitus was...

The Multidimensional View

According to this vision the two categories of sexual pain disorders, dyspareunia and vaginismus, are heterogenous, multisystemic, and multifactorial disorders that should not be characterized as simply a disorder of the pelvic floor or as a pain problems or as a vestibulum problem or as a psychological problem. From this point of view for treatment, an integrated approach is recommended (2).

The Behavioristic View

Another view on the origination of vaginistic reaction comes from the behavior-istic angle. Although the majority of authors with this point of view agree that vaginismus is a conditioned anxiety reaction that results in spasm of the entrance to the vagina (23-26), only a small minority give an explanation for the origination of this behavior. Brinkman, for instance, gave an explanation model (27). He assumed that vaginismus is the end result of a classic conditioning process in which painful sexual intercourse took place. As a consequence of this process, the penis is conditioned into an aversion stimulus that when an approach is made, gives rise to tension and avoidance behavior, which once again leads to painful spasm of, in particular, the vaginal and anal sphincter muscles. Brinkman assumed that conditioning of the vaginistic reaction can occur in various ways. Sometimes one negative experience is enough, particularly in the case of incest or rape. Often, conditioning takes place...

Causes and symptoms

Acquired, situational HSDD in the adult is commonly associated with boredom in the relationship with the sexual partner. Depression, the use of psychoactive or antihypertensive medications, and hormonal deficiencies may contribute to the problem. HSDD may also result from impairment of sexual function, particularly erectile dysfunction on the part of the male, or vaginismus on the part of the female. Vaginismus is defined as a conditioned voluntary contraction or spasm of the lower vaginal muscles resulting from an unconscious desire to prevent vaginal penetration. An incompatibility in sexual interest between the sexual partners may result in relative HSDD in the less sexually active member. This usually occurs in the presence of a sexually demanding partner. painful intercourse. Painful intercourse (dys-pareunia) is more common in women than in men, but may be a deterrent to genital sexual activity in both sexes. The causes are usually physical in nature and related...

Vulvar Vestibulitis Syndrome

Vulvar Vestibulitis Treatment

Other factors Many other physically based etiological theories of vulvar vestibulitis exist however, they are based on uncontrolled studies and should be interpreted with caution. These include human papillomavirus infection (57), faulty immune system functioning allergies (6,58), urethral conditions (e.g., interstitial cystitis) (59), vaginismus (46), sexual abuse (44,60), and psychological factors (e.g., somatization disorder) (46). It is important to note that controlled studies of sexual abuse (10,12) show no difference between affected and non-affected women, although a history of depression and physical abuse has been linked to vulvar vestibulitis (8). Furthermore, an increase in pelvic floor muscle tension (61,62) has also been associated with vulvar vestibulitis. Although the tensing of pelvic floor musculature may represent a protective reaction against, or a conditioned response to vulvar pain, this increase in tension is likely to only exacerbate the pain.

Nomenclature

Orgasm, premature ejaculation, functional dyspareunia, functional vaginismus, and ego-dystonic homosexuality. In DSM-IIIR, ego-dystonic homosexuality was deleted and sexual aversion disorder was added. The names of certain diagnoses were changed. For example, inhibited sexual desire became hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Sexual arousal disorder and male erectile disorder were substituted, respectively, for inhibited male and female sexual arousal disorders. Throughout, changes in criteria sets have been minimal. In DSM-IV, most of the names and criteria sets resemble DSM-IIIR. The requirement that a disorder be diagnosed only if it causes significant personal distress was added to put a high threshold for diagnosis (45). The DSM based classification remains unclear. For instance, it intermingles terms of sexual dysfunction(s) and sexual disorder(s) in an unclear manner. Current nomenclature includes hypoactive sexual desire disorder, sexual aversion disorder, sexual arousal...

Dyspareunia

A woman who has dyspareunia often also has vaginismus. This is an involuntary tightening of the vaginal muscles in response to penetration. It can make intercourse painful, or impossible. Prior sexual trauma. Many women who have been raped or sexually abused as children have dyspareunia. Even when a woman wishes to have sex with someone later, the act of intercourse may trigger memories of the trauma and interfere with her enjoyment of the act. Vaginismus also often occurs in such women. Prior physical trauma to the vaginal area. Women who have had an accidental injury or surgery in the vaginal area may become sensitive to penetration. Vaginismus is common in these cases, as well. Vaginismus An involuntary tightening of the vaginal muscles that makes sexual intercourse painful, difficult, or impossible. The pain is not caused exclusively by vaginismus or lack of lubrication, is not better accounted for by another disorder, and is not due exclusively to the direct effects of a drug,...

The Definition

The assumption that dyspareunia and vaginismus are distinct types of sexual pain disorders has recently been challenged (3-8). Research has demonstrated persistent problems with the sensitivity and specificity of the differential diagnosis of these two phenomena. Both complaints may comprise, to a smaller or larger extent (1) problems with muscle tension (voluntary, involuntary, limited to vaginal sphincter, or extending to pelvic floor, adductor muscles, back, jaws, or entire body), (2) fear of sexual pain (either specifically associated with genital touching intercourse or more generalized fear of pain, or fear of sex), and (3) propensity for behavioral approach or avoidance. All these three phenomena are typical of vaginismus, but may also be present in dyspareunia. Also, differentiation between vaginismus and dyspareunia using clinical tools is difficult, or nearly impossible (3,7,8), and vaginal spasms cannot be diagnosed reliably (3). Only physical therapists can differentiate...

The Pain View

In a recent review article, Reissing et al. have raised the question as to the extent to which the existing concept of vaginismus is correct (5). Is the increased pelvic floor muscle tension actually characteristic of vaginismus In their view, the role of the pelvic floor muscles in vaginismus is identical to the role of the muscles in chronic tension headaches an important symptom, but not of decisive importance to the diagnosis. Does this apply to the experience of pain They believe that in vaginistic patients, until now the pain or the changed sensations (dysesthesia) have been unjustly bypassed. Is vaginismus therefore a phobic reaction to penetration This is indeed the case in some vaginistic women, but it is not clear whether this fear is cause or consequence. In their view, women with vaginismus are suffering from an aversion phobia for vaginal penetration, or from a genital pain problem, or both. If the aversion phobia lies in the forefront, then cognitive behavioral therapy...

The Somatic View

From a purely somatic point of view, constriction or an obstruction can be solved by using a scalpel. Although Walthard rejected surgical intervention for the treatment of vaginismus as early as in 1909 (45), and Sikkel-Bufinga (46), who performed a follow-up study found that only one vaginistic patient had benefitted from the surgical knife, until recently a few doctors could still be found who opted for such a surgical approach (47). The least vigorous method is dilatation plasty, in contrast with the far more drastic perineal plasty or levator plasty, in which part of the pelvic floor muscles are also cleaved through the midline. The emotional consequences of such an operation can be enormous. The most important consequence is that the woman loses control of her pelvic floor muscles, together with the control over her body and her right to self-determination. This is even more painful when the phenomenon vaginismus is used as a solution for relationship problems. It is remarkable...

Cognitive Therapy

Owing to the fact that vaginismus is often a conditioned response, the role of cognitive therapy is small. The active ingredient in cognitive therapy is therefore to break the conditioned response, that is, just get on with things (exposure in vivo). Women with vaginismus will undoubtedly have irrational thoughts of too thick, does not fit, and so on, especially when the complaints have been present for some time. Although such thoughts can be removed cognitively by means of good patient education, in principle, this will have little or no effect on the occurrence of the complaints. Many patients have followed this path of little success. The most important aspect of cognitive therapy therefore is not so much removing the complaint, but instead motivating the patient, offering insight into the origination of the complaint, and further tackling the problem if it appears to contain a strong rational component. Particularly if the woman's body is expressing what she cannot put into...

Diagnosing FSAD

If she reports trouble reaching orgasm or cannot climax at all, FOD is the most likely diagnosis. If she reports pain during intercourse, or if penetration is difficult or impossible, the clinician may conclude that dyspareunia or vaginismus is the most accurate diagnostic label. In general, women have difficulty perceiving genital changes associated with sexual arousal (37). However, women who report little or no desire for sexual activity, lack of orgasm, or sexual pain, may in fact be insufficiently sexually aroused during sexual activity. It is particularly difficult to differentiate between FSAD and FOD. FOD is defined as the persistent or recurrent delay in, or absence of, orgasm following a normal sexual excitement phase (1). In cases where the clinician does not have access to a psychophysiological test in which a woman is presented with (visual and or tactile) sexual stimuli, while genital responses are being measured, it cannot be established that her deficient...

Treatment Protocol

Treatment according to protocol comprises an, at the start, unknown number of sessions. The first session takes 45-60 min. Subsequent sessions take 20 min. Sessions are held once every 2-4 weeks. Major components of the treatment include information about vaginismus, a physical examination, explanation of the treatment, behavioral therapy, sensation focus exercises, pelvic floor muscle exercises, systematic desensitization, and cognitive therapy. These Information About Vaginismus Categorically, information is given about what vaginismus is, the types of vaginismus (complete, situational, primary, secondary), the difference from dyspar-eunia, the vicious circle, how often it occurs, the reaction of the partner, the consequences on sexual satisfaction, the wish to have children, pregnancy, delivery, possible causes (psychological, relational, social, physical), the role of the pelvic floor muscles, the relationship between vaginismus and complaints related to micturition and or...

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