Clinical Manifestations

Most studies report that 25% of men and 70% of women infected with C. trachomatis are asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health Study collected data prospectively from 14,322 U.S adolescents and followed them into adulthood (Miller et al., 2004). Of the participants that tested positive for chlamydial infection, 95% did not report symptoms in the 24 hours preceding specimen collection. Among men with chlamydial infection, the prevalences of urethral discharge and dysuria were only 3.3% and 1.9%, respectively. Among women with chlamydial infection, the prevalences of vaginal discharge and dysuria were 0.3% and 4.2%, respectively. Among the small number of young men reporting urethral discharge (n = 17), the prevalence of chlamydial infection was high (38.5%), whereas the prevalence of chlamydial infection was only 6.0% among the women reporting dysuria (n = 232) and 0.9% among those reporting vaginal discharge (n = 98) (Miller et al., 2004).

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