Selected Photomicrographs

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A. Normal exocrine pancreas and pancreatitis (Figure 17-3)

Figure 17-3. (A) Light micrograph of normal exocrine pancreas. Acinar cells containing numerous granules (gr) arc arranged in clusters. A small capillary (cap) and duct (arrow) can be observed. (B) Light micrograph of pancreatitis. A large area of exocrine pancreas (ex) is shown surrounded by thick fibrous bands (fib) that are highly infiltrated with lymphocytes (inflammatory response). Acinar cells undergoing autolysis are shown (arrows). Acute pancreatitis is associated in 80% of patients with biliary tract disease or obstruction and alcoholism. The pathologic destruction of the pancreas results from the release of digestive enzymes from acinar cells. (B: Reprinted with permission from East Carolina University, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology slide collection.)

Figure 17-3. (A) Light micrograph of normal exocrine pancreas. Acinar cells containing numerous granules (gr) arc arranged in clusters. A small capillary (cap) and duct (arrow) can be observed. (B) Light micrograph of pancreatitis. A large area of exocrine pancreas (ex) is shown surrounded by thick fibrous bands (fib) that are highly infiltrated with lymphocytes (inflammatory response). Acinar cells undergoing autolysis are shown (arrows). Acute pancreatitis is associated in 80% of patients with biliary tract disease or obstruction and alcoholism. The pathologic destruction of the pancreas results from the release of digestive enzymes from acinar cells. (B: Reprinted with permission from East Carolina University, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology slide collection.)

B. Islet of Langerhans in normal patient, patient with type 1 diabetes, and patient with type 2 diabetes (Figure 17-4)

Figure 17-4. (A) Light micrograph of normal islet of Langerhans. A normal islet of Langerhans (dotted circle) is shown surrounded by exocrine pancreas (ex). (B) Light micrograph of an islet of Langerhans in a patient with type 1 diabetes. The islet (dotted circle) is shown with conspicuous lymphocytic infiltration (insulitis reaction; arrow) that probably leads to the destruction of the beta cells within the islet. (C) Light micrograph of an islet of Langerhans in a patient with type 2 diabetes. The islet (dotted circle) is shown with conspicuous amyloid (see Chapter 3 V G) deposition (arrows). (B, C: Reprinted with permission from East Carolina University, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology slide collection.)

Figure 17-4. (A) Light micrograph of normal islet of Langerhans. A normal islet of Langerhans (dotted circle) is shown surrounded by exocrine pancreas (ex). (B) Light micrograph of an islet of Langerhans in a patient with type 1 diabetes. The islet (dotted circle) is shown with conspicuous lymphocytic infiltration (insulitis reaction; arrow) that probably leads to the destruction of the beta cells within the islet. (C) Light micrograph of an islet of Langerhans in a patient with type 2 diabetes. The islet (dotted circle) is shown with conspicuous amyloid (see Chapter 3 V G) deposition (arrows). (B, C: Reprinted with permission from East Carolina University, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology slide collection.)

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Alcohol No More

Alcohol No More

Do you love a drink from time to time? A lot of us do, often when socializing with acquaintances and loved ones. Drinking may be beneficial or harmful, depending upon your age and health status, and, naturally, how much you drink.

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