Selected Photomicrographs

The Gallstone Elimination Report

Gallstone Elimination Manual by David Smith

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A. Electron micrographs of hepatocytes, Kupffer cell, space of Disse, and hilc canaliculus and light micrograph of portal triad (Figure 16-3)

Figure 16-3. (A-C) Electron micrographs of the liver. (A) A Kupffer cell (K) is shown within the lumen of a hepatic sinusoid (sin). The sinusoid is lined by a discontinuous endothelium (end). I I = hepatocyte. (B) The apical border of a hcpatocytes (H) is shown projecting microvilli into the space of Disse (SD). The space of Disse is separated from the hepatic sinusoid (sin) by a discontinuous endothelium (end). (C) Two adjaccnt hepatocytes (H) are shown abutting each other to form a bile canaliculus (be) that is bounded by tight junctions (arrows) that serve to contain the bile. (D) Light micrograph of the liver showing the three components of a portal tract: branch of hepatic artery (HA), branch of portal vein (PV), and branch of bile duct (BD). A lymphatic vessel (LYM) also is apparent.

Figure 16-3. (A-C) Electron micrographs of the liver. (A) A Kupffer cell (K) is shown within the lumen of a hepatic sinusoid (sin). The sinusoid is lined by a discontinuous endothelium (end). I I = hepatocyte. (B) The apical border of a hcpatocytes (H) is shown projecting microvilli into the space of Disse (SD). The space of Disse is separated from the hepatic sinusoid (sin) by a discontinuous endothelium (end). (C) Two adjaccnt hepatocytes (H) are shown abutting each other to form a bile canaliculus (be) that is bounded by tight junctions (arrows) that serve to contain the bile. (D) Light micrograph of the liver showing the three components of a portal tract: branch of hepatic artery (HA), branch of portal vein (PV), and branch of bile duct (BD). A lymphatic vessel (LYM) also is apparent.

B. Light micrograph of normal liver and alcoholic liver cirrhosis (Figure 16-4).

Figure 16-4. (A) Light micrograph of normal liver. The classic liver lobules (outlined) with central vein (circle) are clearly delineated. (B-D) Light micrographs of alcoholic cirrhosis. (B) Broad bands of fibrous septae (fib) are present in alcoholic cirrhosis that bridge regions of the liver from central vein to portal triad and from portal triad to portal triad. This fibrotic activity entraps sections of hepatic parenchyma that undergo regeneration to form nodules (nod). (C) Neutrophil, lymphocyte, and macrophage infiltration (asterisk) is prominent at the periphery of the liver lobule. (D) Some hepatocytes accumulate tangled masses of cytokeratin intermediate filaments within the cytoplasm known as Mallory bodies (arrow). (B-D: Reprinted with permission from East Carolina University, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology slide collection.)

C. Light micrograph of normal gall bladder and cholecystitis (Figure 16-5).

Figure 16-5. (A) Light micrograph of normal gallbladder. Numerous mucosal folds lined by a simple columnar epithelium are shown that project into the lumen of the gallbladder. These mucosal folds flatten out as the gallbladder is distended. At times, the mucosa may penetrate deep into the muscularis externa to form Roki-tansky-Aschoff sinuses, which are early indicators of pathologic changes within the mucosa. (B) Light micrograph of cholecystitis. Acute or chronic cholecystitis is generally associated with the presence of gallstones. In this case, the mucosal epithelium is completely obliterated, and there is focal hemorrhage (hem) and lymphocyte infiltration (asterisk) of the lamina propria. (B. Reprinted with permission from East Carolina University, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology slide collection.)

Figure 16-5. (A) Light micrograph of normal gallbladder. Numerous mucosal folds lined by a simple columnar epithelium are shown that project into the lumen of the gallbladder. These mucosal folds flatten out as the gallbladder is distended. At times, the mucosa may penetrate deep into the muscularis externa to form Roki-tansky-Aschoff sinuses, which are early indicators of pathologic changes within the mucosa. (B) Light micrograph of cholecystitis. Acute or chronic cholecystitis is generally associated with the presence of gallstones. In this case, the mucosal epithelium is completely obliterated, and there is focal hemorrhage (hem) and lymphocyte infiltration (asterisk) of the lamina propria. (B. Reprinted with permission from East Carolina University, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology slide collection.)

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Get Rid of Gallstones Naturally

Get Rid of Gallstones Naturally

One of the main home remedies that you need to follow to prevent gallstones is a healthy lifestyle. You need to maintain a healthy body weight to prevent gallstones. The following are the best home remedies that will help you to treat and prevent gallstones.

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