Venuss girdle

Cestum veneris

ORDER

Cydippida

FAMILY

Cestidae

TAXONOMY

Cestum veneris Lesueur, 1813 (= Cestus veneris Chun, 1879 and 1880).

OTHER COMMON NAMES

None known.

I Cestum veneris I Vallicula multiformis

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Ribbon-shaped, reaching lengths of 4.9 ft (1.5 m) but only 3.1 in (8 cm) in width. The ctene rows are all on one side of this ribbon, with the mouth on the other.

DISTRIBUTION

Atlantic, Pacific, Antarctic, and Mediterranean waters.

HABITAT Surface waters.

BEHAVIOR

Has an escape behavior that consists of a snakelike undulation of the long body enabling the ctenophore to move several body lengths in seconds.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Swims horizontally in the water column, moving 3.2-6.5 ft (1-2 m) before moving vertically (up or down 1.9-3.9 in [5-10 cm]) and reversing direction. This behavior results in the cestid retracing its original path offset by 1.9-3.9 in (5-10 cm) above or below. Prey capture is on the tentacles lying over the body and the ctenes generate small vortices that may enhance prey movement and capture as the cestid moves back and forth through the water. Prey includes copepods and small mollusks.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Eggs and sperm develop in the meridional canals in a similar fashion as most other ctenophores.

CONSERVATION STATUS Not listed by the IUCN.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment