Astrids rotifer

Encentrum astridae

FAMILY

Dicranophoridae

TAXONOMY

Encentrum astridae Sorensen, 2001, Bermuda.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

None known.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Measures 0.0121-0.0153 in (308-388 pm). Body is illoricate, elongate, and fusiform. Foot is relatively long and composed of one pseudo-segment, with two closely set parallel-sided toes. Trophi belong to the forceps-like forcipate type that always has relatively slender elements. The species is recognized easily by its very long unci and supramanubria.

DISTRIBUTION

The species has been recorded from Bermuda and Denmark and probably has a North Atlantic to mid-Atlantic distribution.

HABITAT

It lives in the interstices of sand grains in the tidal and subtidal zones of sandy beaches.

Edgar Caye Nibiru

I Floscularia ringens I Encentrum astridae

BEHAVIOR

Nothing is known.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET Nothing is known.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Obligate parthenogenetic or hétérogamie. Males never have been recorded.

CONSERVATION STATUS Not listed by the IUCN.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

No common name

Floscularia ringens

FAMILY

Flosculariidae

TAXONOMY

Serpula ringens Linnaeus, 1758, Europe.

OTHER COMMON NAMES None known.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS Females measure about 0.0748 in (1,900 pm) and males 0.0157-0.0236 in (400-600 pm). Corona is large, with four lobes. Trunk and foot are elongated, and the foot terminates in an adhesive disc. Trophi belong to the malleoramate type, which resembles the ramate type but has a fulcrum and more devel oped manubria. Floscularia ringens is sessile and lives in a tube made of detritus and fecal pellets. The species is recognized most easily by the appearance of the tube, which is dark yellow to brownish in color and composed of relatively small pellets.

DISTRIBUTION

Cosmopolitan.

HABITAT

In freshwater attached to stalks or leaves of submerged plants.

BEHAVIOR

Nothing is known.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Filters microalgae and bacteria from the water.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Heterogamic cycle with mictic and amictic phases.

CONSERVATION STATUS Not listed by the IUCN.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

No common name

Cephalodella gibba

FAMILY

Notommatidae

TAXONOMY

Furcularia gibba Ehrenberg, 1832, Germany.

Rotifer Reproduction

Cephalodella gibba I Dissotrocha aculeata

OTHER COMMON NAMES None known.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Females measure 0.00984-0.0177 in (250-450 pm), males 0.00539-0.00906 in (137-230 pm). Body is gibbous and laterally compressed with a thin lorica. Foot is short and has two relatively long and slender toes that are straight or bent slightly dorsally. Trophi belong to the virgate type. The general appearance of this species is characteristic for Cephalodella, and C. gibba is easily distinguished from other Cephalodella by its relatively large size, long toes, and large trophi.

DISTRIBUTION Cosmopolitan.

HABITAT

Lives among the vegetation in freshwater ponds, lakes, and streams. Occasionally also present in brackish water.

BEHAVIOR

Nothing is known.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feeds on algae, flagellates and other microinvertebrates.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Heterogamic cycle with mictic and amictic phase.

CONSERVATION STATUS Not listed by the IUCN.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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