Yellowheaded gecko

Gonatodes albogularis

SUBFAMILY

Gekkoninae

TAXONOMY

Gymnodactylus albogularis Duméril and Bibron, 1836, Martinique and Cuba. Four subspecies are recognized.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Gonatode à gorge blanche; German: Weisskehlgecko; Spanish: Geco cabeza-amarilla

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

The species reaches 1.3-1.8 in (32-45 mm) in snout-vent length. The dorsal scales are granular, the pupils are round, and the digits are narrow, without enlarged toe pads. Males are gray to black with a yellow head, and females are gray with dark brown mottling.

DISTRIBUTION

Gonatodes albogularis albogularis exists in Aruba, Curaçao, eastern Colombia, and northwestern Venezuela. G. a. bodinii lives in the Archipelago de Los Monjes, Venezuela. G. a. fuscus inhabits Cuba and Central America to northwestern Colombia; it was introduced into southern Florida. G. a. notatus occurs in Hispaniola, Jamaica.

HABITAT

The geckos live under debris and on trees in a variety of habitats. They also occur on buildings and in piles of lumber or trash.

BEHAVIOR

The species is diurnal and basks in partly exposed positions on houses or trees.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

The diet consists of small arthropods.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

The female lays several clutches of single hard-shelled eggs a year.

CONSERVATION STATUS Not threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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