Western banded gecko

Coleonyx variegatus

SUBFAMILY

Eublepharinae

TAXONOMY

Stenodactylus variegatus Baird, 1859, Rio Grande and Gila Valleys, Arizona, United States. Five subspecies are recognized.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Coleonyx varié; German: Gebänderter Krallengecko; Spanish: Salamanquesa de franjas.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

This species reaches 3 in (75 mm) in snout-vent length. The body is covered in fine granules; the digits are slender, without pads; and the tail is constricted at the base. These geckos have movable eyelids and vertical pupils. They are pink to pale yellow, with brown bands, blotches, or irregular markings.

DISTRIBUTION

The subspecies Coleonyx variegatus variegatus lives in southeastern California, southwestern Nevada, and western Arizona in the United States and the northern Gulf of California, Mexico. C. v. abbotti occurs in southwestern California in the United States and northern Baja California, Mexico. C. v. bogerti lives in southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico in the United States and northern Sonora, Mexico. C. v. sonoriensis inhabits western Sonora and southern Baja California, Mexico. C. v. utahensis occurs in Utah, southern Nevada, and northwestern Arizona.

HABITAT

The species inhabits rocky desert and semidesert.

BEHAVIOR

These geckos are nocturnal; several individuals may aggregate in a single burrow.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

The species is a generalist arthropod feeder. Energy is stored as fat in the tail.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

The female lays two leathery-shelled eggs per clutch, usually between May and September.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Although not listed by the IUCN, the San Diego banded gecko (C. v. abbotti) is of special concern in California.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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