Jeweled chameleon

Chameleon Care Guide

Chameleon Care Guide

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Furcifer campani

TAXONOMY

Furcifer campani Grandidier, 1872, Massif de l'Ankaratra, Madagascar.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Campan's chameleon; Malagasy: Kamora, soamaran-drana.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

This species attains a length of 4-5.5 in (107-133 mm). There are three longitudinal white or yellowish stripes on each flank, and rows of colored dots cover the body. Red markings outline the ridge above the eyes. The body color in calm females is green; they are black when excited or stressed. Males are brown.

DISTRIBUTION

The species inhabits the high plateaus south of Antananarivo, Madagascar in Ambatolampy, Ambohimitombo, Andringitra, Ankaratra, Antobeba, Ibity, and Manjakatompo.

HABITAT

The jeweled chameleon inhabits grasslands, shrubs, and savanna and is semiterrestrial.

BEHAVIOR

This is a small and shy species.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

The jeweled chameleon preys upon small invertebrates.

I Furcifer campani I Furcifer minor I Furcifer pardalis

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

The reproductive biology is unknown.

CONSERVATION STATUS

The species is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN based on a 20% population decline in 10 years, or three generations. It is listed on CITES Appendix II and included in the 1995 CITES moratorium on importation, but specimens are known to have been imported for the commercial pet trade at least through 2002.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

More than 15,000 wild-taken specimens were exported legally to the commercial pet trade from 1986 to 1996. There was no documented long-term survivability or reproduction in captivity. ♦

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