Central netted dragon

Ctenophorus inermis (sometimes called C. nuchalis)

SUBFAMILY

Agaminae

TAXONOMY

Ctenophorus inermis De Vis, 1884, Delta Station, Bogantungan, Queensland, Australia.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

None known.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

These are medium-size yellowish brown terrestrial desert lizards with relatively short legs, a low crest along the top of the neck, a narrow vertebral stripe, and a blunt snout. Breeding males have orange to reddish heads and throats.

DISTRIBUTION

The species occurs in desert regions of central Australia.

disturbed in their burrows, they dash off and hide in another nearby burrow. Body temperatures correlate with ambient air temperatures, averaging about 96.8°F (36°C). When ambient air temperatures are high, the lizards climb up as high as 3.3 ft (1 m) above ground and face directly into the sun. Varanid monitor lizards prey upon central netted dragons.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

These lizards are omnivorous. They eat such insects as ants, grasshoppers, beetles, and termites and are partially herbivorous, taking about 25% of their diet by volume in plant food.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Males defend territories during the breeding season in the spring months. Clutch sizes range from two to six eggs, depending on the size of the female; the average is about four eggs.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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