Historical And Literary Precedents

Get Paid To Write Online

Get Paid to Write at Home

Get Instant Access

Historical Figure With Disease

FIGURE 1 Franciscus de le Böe (1614-1672). Also known as Sylvius de le Böe, and Francis-cus Sylvius, this early physician was a Professor of Leiden and a celebrated anatomist. In his medical writings, he also described tremors and he may be among the very earliest writers on involuntary movement disorders (2).

FIGURE 1 Franciscus de le Böe (1614-1672). Also known as Sylvius de le Böe, and Francis-cus Sylvius, this early physician was a Professor of Leiden and a celebrated anatomist. In his medical writings, he also described tremors and he may be among the very earliest writers on involuntary movement disorders (2).

Boissier Sauvages

FIGURE 2 François Boissier de Sauvages de la Croix (1706-1767). Sauvages was cited by Parkinson himself and described patients with "running disturbances of the limbs," scelotyrbe fes-tinans. Such subjects had difficulty in walking, moving with short and hasty steps. He considered the problem to be due to diminished flexibility of muscle fibers—possibly his manner of describing rigidity (2,3).

FIGURE 2 François Boissier de Sauvages de la Croix (1706-1767). Sauvages was cited by Parkinson himself and described patients with "running disturbances of the limbs," scelotyrbe fes-tinans. Such subjects had difficulty in walking, moving with short and hasty steps. He considered the problem to be due to diminished flexibility of muscle fibers—possibly his manner of describing rigidity (2,3).

Shakespeare

FIGURE 3 William Shakespeare. A brilliant medical observer and writer, Shakespeare, described many neurological conditions, including epilepsy, somnambulism, and dementia. In Henry VI, first produced in 1590, the character, Dick, notices that Say is trembling: "Why dost thou quiver, man," he asks, and Say responds, "The palsy and not fear provokes me" (2). Jean-Martin Charcot frequently cited Shakespeare in his medical lectures and classroom presentations and disputed the concept that tremor was a natural accompaniment of normal aging. He rejected "senile tremor" as a separate nosographic entity. After reviewing his data from the Salpetriere service where 2000 elderly inpatients lived, he turned to Shakespeare's renditions of elderly figures: "Do not commit the error that many others do and misrepresent tremor as a natural accompaniment of old age. Remember that our venerated Dean, Dr. Chevreul, today 102 years old, has no tremor whatsoever. And you must remember in his marvelous descriptions of old age (Henry IVand /4s You Like It), the master observer, Shakespeare, never speaks of tremor" (4,5).

FIGURE 3 William Shakespeare. A brilliant medical observer and writer, Shakespeare, described many neurological conditions, including epilepsy, somnambulism, and dementia. In Henry VI, first produced in 1590, the character, Dick, notices that Say is trembling: "Why dost thou quiver, man," he asks, and Say responds, "The palsy and not fear provokes me" (2). Jean-Martin Charcot frequently cited Shakespeare in his medical lectures and classroom presentations and disputed the concept that tremor was a natural accompaniment of normal aging. He rejected "senile tremor" as a separate nosographic entity. After reviewing his data from the Salpetriere service where 2000 elderly inpatients lived, he turned to Shakespeare's renditions of elderly figures: "Do not commit the error that many others do and misrepresent tremor as a natural accompaniment of old age. Remember that our venerated Dean, Dr. Chevreul, today 102 years old, has no tremor whatsoever. And you must remember in his marvelous descriptions of old age (Henry IVand /4s You Like It), the master observer, Shakespeare, never speaks of tremor" (4,5).

FIGURE 4 Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835). The celebrated academic reformer and writer, von Humboldt, lived in the era of Parkinson and described his own neurological condition in a series of letters, analyzed by Horowski (6). The statue by Friedrich Drake shown in the figure captures the hunched, flexed posture of Parkinson's disease, but von Humboldt's own words capture the tremor and bradykinesia of the disease:

FIGURE 4 Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835). The celebrated academic reformer and writer, von Humboldt, lived in the era of Parkinson and described his own neurological condition in a series of letters, analyzed by Horowski (6). The statue by Friedrich Drake shown in the figure captures the hunched, flexed posture of Parkinson's disease, but von Humboldt's own words capture the tremor and bradykinesia of the disease:

Trembling of the hands . . . occurs only when both or one of them is inactive; at this very moment, for example, only the left one is trembling but not the right one that I am using to write If I am using my hands this strange clumsiness starts which is hard to describe. It is obviously weakness as I am unable to carry heavy objects as I did earlier on, but it appears with tasks that do not need strength but consist of quite fine movements, and especially with these. In addition to writing, I can mention rapid opening of books, dividing of fine pages, unbuttoning and buttoning up of clothes. All of these as well as writing proceed with intolerable slowness and clumsiness (7).

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Unraveling Alzheimers Disease

Unraveling Alzheimers Disease

I leave absolutely nothing out! Everything that I learned about Alzheimer’s I share with you. This is the most comprehensive report on Alzheimer’s you will ever read. No stone is left unturned in this comprehensive report.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment