Other Demographic Variables

Chronological age and income are, of course, not the only demographic variables that are related to annual expenditures. Because of their higher average incomes, professionals and executives spend more than people in occupations lower on the status scale. Some other variables that are associ— ated with expenditures are race/ethnicity, education, geographical region of residence, urban versus rural location of residences, and whether the individ— ual owns or rents his or her home. Illustrated in Figure 11-2 are the facts that, on the average, whites spend more than blacks, non—Hispanics spend more than Hispanics, college graduates spend more than noncollege graduates, homeowners spend more than renters, urban residents spend more than rural residents, and people who live in the West and Northeast spend more than people who live in the Midwest and South (unpublished data for 1995 pro— vided

Race/Ethnicity: Black White & Other Hispanic Non-Hispanic Education: Not high school grad High school graduate Some college College graduate Geographical Region: Midwest Northeast South West

Urban/Rural Residence: Urban Rural

Status of Home: Owned Rented

Average Annual Expenditures ($Thousands)

Figure 11-2 Differences in average annual expenditures by race/ethnicity, education, geographical region, and urban/rural residence. (Based on unpublished data from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, November 25, 1996.)

Average Annual Expenditures ($Thousands)

Figure 11-2 Differences in average annual expenditures by race/ethnicity, education, geographical region, and urban/rural residence. (Based on unpublished data from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, November 25, 1996.)

by U.S. Department of Labor). All of these demographic variables are, of course, interrelated and associated with the more general variable of socioeconomic status.

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