Figure 2423

Diagram of the arterial supply of the membranous labyrinth of the internal ear. The blood supply to the membranous labyrinth of the internal ear is derived from the labyrinthine artery, a branch of the anterior inferior cerebellar or basilar artery. (Modified from Schuknecht HF. Pathology of the Ear. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1974.)

blood supply to tissues of the membranous labyrinth of the internal ear is derived intracranially from the labyrinthine artery, a common branch of the anterior inferior cerebellar or basilar artery (Fig. 24.23). The labyrinthine artery is a terminal artery, in that it has no anastomoses with other surrounding arteries. Branches of this artery exactly parallel the distribution of the superior and inferior parts of the vestibular nerve.

Venous drainage from the cochlear labyrinth is via the posterior and anterior spiral modiolar veins that form the common modiolar vein. The common modiolar vein and the vestibulocochlear vein form the vein of the cochlear aqueduct, which empties into the inferior petrosal sinus. Venous drainage from the vestibular labyrinth is via vestibular veins that join the vein of the cochlear aqueduct and by the vein of vestibular aqueduct, which drains into the sigmoid sinus.

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