Purpose

The goal of bibliotherapy is to broaden and deepen the client's understanding of the particular problem that requires treatment. The written materials may educate the client about the disorder itself or be used to increase the client's acceptance of a proposed treatment. Many people find that the opportunity to read about their problem outside the therapist's office facilitates active participation in their treatment and promotes a stronger sense of personal responsibility for recovery. In addition, many are relieved to find that others have had the same disorder or problem and have coped successfully with it or recovered from it. From the therapist's standpoint, providing a client with specific information or assignments to be completed outside regular in-office sessions speeds the progress of therapy.

Adjunct—A form of treatment that is not strictly necessary to a therapy regimen but is helpful.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy—An approach to psychotherapy that emphasizes the correction of distorted thinking patterns and changing one's behaviors accordingly.

Dyslexia—A type of reading disorder.

Regimen—A regulated course of treatment for a medical or mental disorder.

Bibliotherapy has been applied in a variety of settings to many kinds of psychological problems. Practitioners have reported successful use of bibliotherapy in treating eating disorders, anxiety and mood disorders, agoraphobia, alcohol and substance abuse, and stress-related physical disorders.

Bibliotherapy has been applied in a variety of settings to many kinds of psychological problems, including eating disorders, anxiety and mood disorders, and alcohol and substance abuse. Many people find that the opportunity to read about their problem outside the therapist's office facilitates active participation in their treatment. (Joseph Nettis. Photo Researchers, Inc. Reproduced by permission.)

Bibliotherapy has been applied in a variety of settings to many kinds of psychological problems, including eating disorders, anxiety and mood disorders, and alcohol and substance abuse. Many people find that the opportunity to read about their problem outside the therapist's office facilitates active participation in their treatment. (Joseph Nettis. Photo Researchers, Inc. Reproduced by permission.)

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