Key Terms a

Abuse—Substance abuse is a milder form of t addiction than substance dependence. Generally, d people who have been diagnosed with substance g abuse don't experience the tolerance or withdrawal symptoms— the signs of physiological d dependence— that people dependent on a sub- a stance experience. IT

Anxiolytic—A preparation or substance given to relieve anxiety; a tranquilizer.

Barbiturates—A class of medications (including Seconal and Nembutal) that causes sedation and drowsiness. They may be prescribed legally, but may also be used as drugs of abuse.

Benzodiazepines—A group of central nervous system depressants used to relieve anxiety or to induce sleep.

Dependence—The adaptation of neurons and other physical processes to the use of a drug, followed by withdrawal symptoms when the drug is removed; physiological and/ or psychological addiction.

GHB—GHB, or gamma hydroxybutyrate, is a central nervous system depressant that has been abused in the United States for euphoric, sedative, bodybuilding, and date-rape purposes.

Intoxication—the presence of significant problem behaviors or psychological changes following ingestion of a substance.

Ketamine—An anesthetic used predominately by veterinarians to treat animals that can be used as a date-rape drug.

Rohypnol—Rohypnol, or flunitrazepam, is a central nervous system depressant that is not legal in the United States, but is used as a date-rape drug.

Sedative—A medication that induces relaxation and sleep.

Tranquilizer—A medication that induces a feeling of calm and relaxation.

Withdrawal—Symptoms experienced by a person who has become physically dependent on a drug, experienced when the drug use is discontinued.

The use of anti-anxiety drugs can pose extreme danger when taken along with other medications that cause CNS depression, such as prescription pain medicines, some over-the-counter cold and allergy medications, or

Anti-anxiety drugs are powerful central nervous system depressants. They are often prescribed to reduce feelings of tension and anxiety, and/or to induce sleep. Anti-anxiety medications are among the most abused drugs in the United States. (Thomas Craig/FPG International Corp. Reproduced by permission.)

Anti-anxiety drugs are powerful central nervous system depressants. They are often prescribed to reduce feelings of tension and anxiety, and/or to induce sleep. Anti-anxiety medications are among the most abused drugs in the United States. (Thomas Craig/FPG International Corp. Reproduced by permission.)

alcohol. Use of additional depressants can slow breathing and respiration, and can even lead to death.

Withdrawal from anti-anxiety medications can be dangerous if not done under medical supervision. The safest method of withdrawal involves a gradual reduction of dosage. Abrupt withdrawal from these medications can lead to seizures due to sudden increase in brain activity.

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