Zenkers flying mouse

Idiurus zenkeri

SUBFAMILY Zenkerrinae

TAXONOMY

Idiurus zenkeri Matschie, 1894, Yaunde, southern Cameroon. OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Dwarf flying mouse; French: Ecureuil volant de Zenker; German: Zenker Gleitbilch.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

With a head and body less than 3.9 in (10 cm) long, this is the smallest member of the family. Weight: less than 0.5 oz (15 g). The body is buff-colored above, a gray-white below. The tail, 50% longer than the head and body, has an underside fringed with two rows of stiff hairs. Long, scraggly sparsely distributed hairs emerge from the tail's upper surface. The snout is conspicuously upturned and the oddly notched upper incisor teeth are especially long and protrude beyond the lips.

DISTRIBUTION

Central Africa, Cameroon, and Democratic Republic of the Congo.

HABITAT

Primary moist lowland rainforest. BEHAVIOR

Strictly nocturnal and little known. Recorded roosting in hollow trees in groups from three to over 100. Small colonies may also roost under bark. Believed to travel many miles (kilome

ters) a night in search of food. Zenker's flying mouse is an exceptionally agile glider, capable of glides exceeding 164 ft (50 m) and of intricate spirals and of S-shaped glides close to trunks. Shrill mouse-like squeaks have been reported.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET Oil palm pulp, insects, and nectar.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Nothing is known.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Lower Risk/Near Threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

0 0

Post a comment