Serow

Capricornis sumatraensis TAXONOMY

Naemorhedus sumatraensis (Bechstein, 1799), Sumatra, Indonesia.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Serow; German: Serau; Spanish: Sirao.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Head and body length 55-70 in (140-180 cm), height 33-37 in (85-94 cm), and weight 110-300 lb (50-140 kg). Upperparts are gray-black and undersides whitish. Horns are slim and slightly curved back, 6-10 in (15-25 cm).

DISTRIBUTION

Himalaya of India, Nepal, and Bhutan; western China; Southeast Asia (Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia), and Indonesia (Sumatra).

HABITAT

Mountain forests.

BEHAVIOR

Usually solitary or in small groups up to seven. Crepuscular. Rest below rock overhangs and cliffs during the day. Known to swim between islands off the coast of Malaysia.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feeds on a wide range of grasses, shoots, and leaves.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Polygamous. Mate in October-November, and gestation lasts about seven months.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Detailed distribution and local population estimates are unavailable. The population is considered to be declining due to illegal hunting and habitat loss, and it is listed as Vulnerable. C. s. rubidus and C. s. sumatraensis are Endangered.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

Hunted for its meat and other body parts that have medicinal properties. ♦

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