Rio Negro tucotuco

Ctenomys rionegrensis

TAXONOMY

Ctenomys rionegrensis Langguth and Abella, 1970. No subspecies recognized.

OTHER COMMON NAMES Spanish: Tucu-tucu de Rio Negro.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Head and body length 6-10 in (15-25 cm); weight 3.5-25 oz (100-700 g). Three pelage forms: black; brown grayish; and dark-backed (brown grayish with a mid-dorsal black band).

DISTRIBUTION

Occurs in a restricted area of southwestern Rio Negro Province, Uruguay, and in local populations east and west of Entre Rios Province, Argentina.

HABITAT Grasslands.

BEHAVIOR

Presumed colonial. Variable aggressive behavior.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feeds on grasses, herbs, and roots.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Assumed to be polygynous. Probably two litters per year. Litter size is two to four pups. Male and female vocalizations during courtship.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not listed by the IUCN.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

Social tuco-tuco Ctenomys sociabilis

TAXONOMY

Ctenomys sociabilis Pearson and Christie, 1985, Neuquén Province, Argentina. No recognized subspecies.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

Spanish: Tuco-tuco social.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Head and body length is 6.7-9.8 in (17-25 cm); weight is 6.3-8.3 oz (180-235 g). Brown reddish, dark-backed. Light orange patches lateral to the nose.

DISTRIBUTION

Very restricted. Southern Neuquen Province, Argentina. HABITAT

Andean pre-cordillera steppe at the edges of meadow patches. BEHAVIOR

Socially organized in groups of two to six related females sharing the same burrow system. All individuals participate in digging. Males disperse from natal group at the age of four to eight months. Distinctive high-pitched vocalization.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Includes grasses and roots. All group members participate in foraging.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Only one male per colony, suggesting a polygynous-harem reproductive system. All females that share a colony nest are producing milk when lactating pups are present.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not listed by the IUCN, but considered in critical danger by the Argentine Society of Mammalogists.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

Common name / Scientific name

Physical characteristics

Habitat and behavior

Distribution

Diet

Conservation status

Southern tuco-tuco Ctenomys australis

Bolivian tuco-tuco Ctenomys boliviensis

Colburn's tuco-tuco Ctenomys colburnI

Emily's tuco-tuco Ctenomys emilianus

Mottled tuco-tuco Ctenomys latro

Magellanic tuco-tuco Ctenomys magellanicus

Upperparts gray or creamy buff through brown to almost black; underparts are paler. Stiff hair fringes on the hind that form comb-like bristles. Head and body length 5.9-9.8 in (15-25 cm); tail length 2.4-4.3 in (6-11 cm); weight 3.5-24.7 oz (100-700 g).

Upperparts gray or creamy buff through brown to almost black; underparts are paler. Stiff hair fringes on the hind that form comb-like bristles. Head and body length 5.9-9.8 in (15-25 cm); tail length 2.4-4.3 in (6-11 cm); weight 3.5-24.7 oz (100-700 g).

Upperparts gray or creamy buff through brown to almost black; underparts are paler. Stiff hair fringes on the hind that form comb-like bristles. Head and body length 5.9-9.8 in (15-25 cm); tail length 2.4-4.3 in (6-11 cm); weight 3.5-24.7 oz (100-700 g).

Upperparts gray or creamy buff through brown to almost black; underparts are paler. Stiff hair fringes on the hind that form comb-like bristles. Head and body length 5.9-9.8 in (15-25 cm); tail length 2.4-4.3 in (6-11 cm); weight 3.5-24.7 oz (100-700 g).

Upperparts gray or creamy buff through brown to almost black; underparts are paler. Stiff hair fringes on the hind that form comb-like bristles. Head and body length 5.9-9.8 in (15-25 cm); tail length 2.4-4.3 in (6-11 cm); weight 3.5-24.7 oz (100-700 g).

Upperparts gray or creamy buff through brown to almost black; underparts are paler. Stiff hair fringes on the hind that form comb-like bristles. Head and body length 5.9-9.8 in (15-25 cm); tail length 2.4-4.3 in (6-11 cm); weight 3.5-24.7 oz (100-700 g).

Prefer sandy, somewhat dry soil in coastal areas, grassy plains, forests, and the altiplano to 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Dig burrows with a long main tunnel and several short passages. Generally one litter per year.

Prefer sandy, somewhat dry soil in coastal areas, grassy plains, forests, and the altiplano to 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Dig burrows with a long main tunnel and several short passages. Generally one litter per year.

Prefer sandy, somewhat dry soil in coastal areas, grassy plains, forests, and the altiplano to 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Dig burrows with a long main tunnel and several short passages. Generally one litter per year.

Prefer sandy, somewhat dry soil in coastal areas, grass plains, forests, and the altiplano to 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Dig burrows with a long main tunnel and several short passages. Generally one litter per year.

Prefer sandy, somewhat dry soil in coastal areas, grassy plains, forests, and the altiplano to 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Dig burrows with a long main tunnel and several short passages. Generally one litter per year.

Prefer sandy, somewhat dry soil in coastal areas, grassy plains, forests, and the altiplano to 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Dig burrows with a long main tunnel and several short passages. Generally one litter per year.

Buenos Aires Province, eastern Argentina.

Likely vegetarian.

Central Bolivia, western Paraguay, and Formosa Province, Argentina.

Likely vegetarian.

Extreme western Santa Likely vegetarian.

Cruz Province,

Argentina.

Neuquén Province, Argentina, at the base of the Andes.

Likely vegetarian.

Tucumán and Salta Provinces, northwestern Argentina.

Likely vegetarian.

Not listed by IUCN

Not listed by IUCN

Not listed by IUCN

Not listed by IUCN

Lower Risk/Near Threatened

Extreme southern Chile Likely vegetarian. and southern Argentina.

Vulnerable

[continued]

Common name / Scientific name

Physical characteristics

Habitat and behavior

Distribution

Diel

Conservation status

Natterer's tuco-tuco Ctenomys nattereri

Goya tuco-tuco Ctenomys perrensis

Salta tuco-tuco Ctenomys saltarius

Collared tuco-tuco Ctenomys torquatus

Upperparts gray or creamy buff through brown to almost black; underparts are paler. Stiff hair fringes on the hind that form comb-like bristles. Head and body length 5.9-9.8 in (15-25 cm); tail length 2.4-4.3 in (6-11 cm); weight 3.5-24.7 oz (100-700 g).

Upperparts gray or creamy buff through brown to almost black; underparts are paler. Stiff hair fringes on the hind that form comb-like bristles. Head and body length 5.9-9.8 in (15-25 cm); tail length 2.4-4.3 in (6-11 cm); weight 3.5-24.7 oz (100-700 g).

Upperparts gray or creamy buff through brown to almost black; underparts are paler. Stiff hair fringes on the hind that form comb-like bristles. Head and body length 5.9-9.8 in (15-25 cm); tail length 2.4-4.3 in (6-11 cm); weight 3.5-24.7 oz (100-700 g).

Upperparts gray or creamy buff through brown to almost black; underparts are paler. Stiff hair fringes on the hind that form comb-like bristles. Head and body length 5.9-9.8 in (15-25 cm); tail length 2.4-4.3 in (6-11 cm); weight 3.5-24.7 oz (100-700 g).

Prefer sandy, somewhat dry soil In coastal areas, grassy plains, forests, and the altiplano to 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Dig burrows with a long main tunnel and several short passages. Generally one litter per year.

Prefer sandy, somewhat dry soil in coastal areas, grassy plains, forests, and the altiplano to 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Dig burrows with a long main tunnel and several short passages. Generally one litter per year.

Prefer sandy, somewhat dry soil in coastal areas, grassy plains, forests, and the altiplano to 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Dig burrows with a long main tunnel and several short passages. Generally one litter per year.

Prefer sandy, somewhat dry soil in coastal areas, grassy plains, forests, and the altiplano to 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Dig burrows with a long main tunnel and several short passages. Generally one litter per year.

Mato Grosso, Brazil. Likely vegetarian.

Lower Risk/Near Threatened

Corrientes, Entre Ríos, and Misiones Provinces, northeastern Argentina.

Alta and Jujuy Provinces, northern Argentina.

Likely vegetarian.

Not listed by IUCN

Likely vegetarian.

Not listed by IUCN

Uruguay, northeastern Argentina, and extreme southern Brazil.

Likely vegetarian.

Not listed by IUCN

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