Ogilbys duiker

Cephalophus ogilbyi

TAXONOMY

Cephalophus ogilbyi (Waterhouse, 1838), Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. Three subspecies recognized.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Cephalophe d'Ogilby, cephalophe de Fernando Poo; German: Ogilbyducker, Fernando-Poo-Ducker; Spanish: Dui-quero de Ogilby.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Large crouched, slab-shaped body: length 34-46 in (85-115 cm); height 22 in (55 cm); weight 31-40 lb (14-18 kg). Coat color is golden brown to mahogany, darker on the hindquarters, and stippled with gray hairs along the back. Chest and undersides are pale brown or gray. Black stripe traces the length of the spine. Leg color can vary between regions and subspecies. Black muzzle has chestnut-colored arches over the eyes, and short curved horns.

DISTRIBUTION

Common on Bioko Island, particularly along the mountain slopes, but patchy elsewhere. Found in Cameroon, Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone.

HABITAT

Closed canopy rainforest, and lowland forest and montane forest to altitudes of 2,400-3,600 ft (800-1,200 m) on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

BEHAVIOR

Found alone or in pairs, it is presumed to be active during daylight hours.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

The vast majority of its diet is made up of fruits, including those dropped by monkeys. Other vegetation and flowers make up the remainder of its diet.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Nothing is known.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Classified as a Lower Risk/Near Threatened species. Total population estimate is 35,000.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

It is a pest to crop growers and a target of bushmeat hunters. ♦

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