Jentinks duiker

Cephalophus jentinki

TAXONOMY

Cephalophus jentinki Thomas, 1892, Liberia. OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Cephalope de Jentink; German: Jentinkducker; Spanish: Duiquero de Jentink.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

One of the largest of the Cephalophus: length 54 in (135 cm); height 30-33.5 in (75-80 cm); weight up to 154 lb (70 kg). Gray to gray-brown coloring with glossy black head and neck; shoulders are draped with a swath of white or gray hair that descends to the chest. Similar markings encircle the nose and lips. Large ridged horns angle backward from the ears.

DISTRIBUTION

Found in western Guinea, but restricted to scattered populations.

HABITAT

Fragmented habitats, consisting of fruiting trees and thick canopies. A group is said to be living in the forests outside of Freetown, Sierra Leone.

BEHAVIOR

Limited interaction with Jentink's duiker suggests that they are nocturnal animals. Hide in hollow trees by day. Solitary, but often found in pairs.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Relies primarily on the tree seedlings and fruits, including kola nuts, cherry mahogany, and sand apples. Will forage in sec

ondary growth forests, scrub, farmlands, and plantations when fruits are scarce.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Reproductive behavior is relatively unstudied. Gestation estimated at 7-8 months. Calves are born with dark brown coats that adopt the adult coloration by one year of age.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Classified as Vulnerable. An estimated 3,500 individuals remain.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

A pest to farmers and plantation owners, it is also a target for hunters in the bushmeat trade. ♦

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