Hoses pygmy flying squirrel

Petaurillus hosei TAXONOMY

Petaurillus hosei (Thomas, 1900), eastern Sarawak, Malaysia. No subspecies recognized.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

None known.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Head and body length is 6.5 in (17 cm); weight 0.9 oz (25 g). Upperparts are fawn to pale rufous, cheeks are pale buff, and underparts are white.

DISTRIBUTION

Borneo.

HABITAT

Lowland tropical forest and forest edge.

BEHAVIOR

Nocturnal, several reported to nest together.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Unknown, but probably insectivorous.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Nothing is known.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

Common name / Scientific name

Physical characteristics

Habitat and behavior

Distribution

Diet

Conservation status

North Chinese flying squirrel Aeretes melanopterus

Black flying squirrel Aeromys tephromelas

Thomas's flying squirrel Aeromys thomasi

Hairy-footed flying squirrel Belomys pearsonii

Namdapha flying squirrel Biswamoyopterus biswasi

Woolly flying squirrel Eupetaurus cinereus

Gray-cheeked flying squirrel Hylopetes lepidus

Javanese flying squirrel Iomys horsfieldii

Hebei and Sichuan, China.

Malaysian region, except Java and southwestern Philippines.

Borneo, except the southeastern region.

Short, dense, soft fur, dull brownish in color with a slate base. Hairs on side of body have yellowish tips. Underparts are gray to buff, throat and ventral surface are whitish. Gliding membrane is dark brown, head is pale and grayer than back. Tail is bushy with black tip.

Coloration of upperparts is dark brown to black, underparts are grayish brown. Long, slender, round tail is same color as back. Cheeks lack whiskers, ears are moderate in size. Head and body length

11-20.7 in (28-52.7 cm), weight 39.844.1 oz (1,128-1,250 g).

Coloration of upperparts is dark brown to black, underparts are grayish brown. Long, slender, round tail is same color as back. Cheeks lack whiskers, ears are moderate in size. Head and body length

11-20.7 in (28-52.7 cm), weight 48.752.5 oz (1,380-1,490 g).

Top of head and back are glossy reddish brown. Fur is fine, soft, and fairly long. Gliding membrane is dark brown, sparsely washed with red. Hands are reddish brown, underparts are light red to white. No cheek whiskers, feet are covered with long hair, small ears. Head and body length 7-10.2 in (17.8-26 cm), tail length 4-22.8 in (10.2-58 cm).

Upperparts are red grizzled with white, hands and feet are darker, underparts are white. Tail is pale smoky gray, changing into russet. Tail is cylindrical. Head and body length 15.96 in (40.5 cm), tail length 23.8 in (60.5 cm).

Body is covered with thick, soft, woolly Rocky terrain in mountainous High elevations from northern Pakistan and Kashmir to Sikkim.

Species inhabits forests. Other information is unknown.

Mature forests or clearings with a few large trees. They are chiefly nocturnal and spend days curled up in high holes.

Mature forests or clearings with a few large trees. They are chiefly nocturnal and spend days curled up in high holes.

Dense, temperate, broad-leaved forests from 4,920 to 7,870 ft (1,500-2,400 m) in elevation. Not a particularly good glider.

Single species was found at an elevation of 1,150 ft (350 m). Nothing known of reproductive or behavioral patterns.

fur that is dark gray above and paler underneath. Long, trumpet-shaped muzzle. Claws are blunt. Head and body length 20.3-24 in (51.5-61.0 cm), tail length 15-18.9 in (38-48 cm).

Fur is soft, dense, moderately long. Upperparts are grayish with a tinge of brown or yellow. Bright reddish brown, glossy brownish to black across hips and tail. Underparts are white, gray, or yellow. Ears are large and bluntly pointed, claws are short and blunt, tail is flat and tapers at tip. Head and body length 4.3-13 in (11-33 cm), tail length 3.1-11.5 in (829.2 cm).

Upper surface of gliding membrane is bright russet, underparts are grayish to pale orange. Tail is brownish above and chestnut underneath. Large, broad, naked ears. Head and body length 5.79.1 in (14.6-23.1 cm), tail length 6.38.3 in (15.9-21 cm), weight 4.2-8.1 oz 120-231 g).

regions. Little known of reproductive and behavioral patterns.

Various kinds of forest, as well as clearings and cultivated areas, from about 490 to 11,480 ft (150-3,500 m) in elevation. Arboreal and nocturnal.

Forests and plantations at all elevations. Build leaf nests. Litter size ranges from one to four offspring

Southern Vietnam, Thailand to Java; and Borneo.

Malay Peninsula to Java; and Borneo.

Diet unknown, but most likely fruits, nuts, and leaves.

Fruits, nuts, leaves, and probably some insects.

Fruits, nuts, leaves, and probably some insects.

Sikkim and Assam , India, to Hunan, Sichuan, Yunnan, Guizhou, Guangxi, and Hainan, China; Bhutan; Taiwan, Indochina, and northern Myanmar.

Known only from type locality, western slope, Patkai Range in India.

Fruits, nuts, leaves, and probably some insects.

Unknown, most likely fruits, nuts, and leaves.

Lower Risk/Near Threatened

Not threatened

Not threatened

Lower Risk/Near Threatened

Unknown, most likely fruits, nuts, and leaves.

Mainly fruits, but also nuts, tender shoots, leaves, and, apparently, insects and small snakes.

Critically Endangered

Endangered

Not threatened

Unknown, most likely fruits, nuts, and leaves.

Not threatened

[continued]

Common name / Scientific name

Physical characteristics

Habitat and behavior

Distribution

Diet

Conservation status

Whiskered flying squirrel Petinomys genibarbis

Broad, low head with short muzzle. Fur is dense and soft above, thin on lower parts. Coloration of upperparts varies from brown to black, underparts range from white to dark slate. Tail may be buff, darker towards tip. Head and body length 3.6-16 in (9.2-40.6 cm), tail length 3.3-11.5 in (8.5-29.2 cm), weight 3.9 oz (110 g).

Tropical forests up to 3,970 ft (1,210 m) in elevation. Nocturnal, good climbers.

Malaya to Sumatra, Java, and Borneo.

Nuts, fruits, young twigs, tender shoots and leaves, possibly the bark of certain trees, and perhaps some insects.

Not threatened

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