Behavior

They are generally regarded as living in social family groups, agonistic encounters are few and individuals appear

A Cuban hutia (Capromys pilorides) in the trees of Zapatas Swamp, Cuba. (Photo by Animals Animals ©Red Levin. Reproduced by permission.)

Of all hutias, the Jamaican hutia (Geocapromys brownii) has the shortest tail. (Photo by Tom McHugh/Photo Researchers, Inc. Reproduced by permission.)

A Cuban hutia (Capromys pilorides) in the trees of Zapatas Swamp, Cuba. (Photo by Animals Animals ©Red Levin. Reproduced by permission.)

Of all hutias, the Jamaican hutia (Geocapromys brownii) has the shortest tail. (Photo by Tom McHugh/Photo Researchers, Inc. Reproduced by permission.)

some Geocapromys in the branches of mangrove forest can also reveal the presence of hutias in an area.

not to be territorial. Reports of a solitary social structure may result from displaced individuals or very small families. Geocapromys and Capromys are tolerant of conspecifics in captivity and will live in loose groups. Communal nesting has been reported in both Mesocapromys and Plagiodontia in the wild. Social groups frequently groom each other and a variety of low vocalisations are used.

Runs in and around natural rock crevices and fecal deposits often reveal the presence of hutias. The large stick nests of

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