Bay duiker

Cephalophus dorsalis

TAXONOMY

Cephalophus dorsalis Gray, 1846, Sierra Leone. Two subspecies. OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Black-striped duiker; French: Cephalophe a bande dorsale noire, cephalophe bai; German: Schwarzruckenducker.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Medium to large duiker: length 28-40 in (70-100 cm); height 16-22 in (40-55 cm); weight 33-44 lb (15-20 kg). Has reddish brown coat, with blue or brown-gray legs and black dorsal stripe; white underside; white lips and lower chin. Smooth, short horns. Large maxillary glands.

DISTRIBUTION

Guinea-Bissau to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and as far south as Angola.

HABITAT

Dense lowland forests of West and Central Africa.

BEHAVIOR

Found alone or paired with mate or calf. Forage for food only between dusk and dawn.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Consumes mainly fruits, leaves, grasses, young branches and saplings, buds, and some insects and eggs. Occasionally will chase and kill small rodents, or other small animals.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous. Females reach sexual maturity between nine and 12 months of age, approximately 3-6 months earlier than the male. Calves are weaned early, by five months.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Labeled as a Lower Risk/Near Threatened species.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS Hunted for bushmeat. ♦

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