Baha hairy dwarf porcupine

Sphiggurus insidiosus

SUBFAMILY

Erethizontinae

TAXONOMY

Sphiggurus insidiosus (Lichtenstein, 1818), Bahía, Brazil. OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Porc-épic arboricole nain, porc-épic laineux; German: Wollige Greifstachler; Spanish: Coendú, ouri^o cacheiro.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Although few specimens exist, they are believed to range from about 24 to 31 in (60-80 cm) in total length with a tail about a third to two-fifths of that length, and to have a body weight of about 2.6-3.3 lb (1.2-1.5 kg). Nearly completely dark-brown porcupine with spines that are concealed beneath thick, soft fur. The spines are whitish at the base, becoming brown distally, sometimes with orangish tips. The prehensile tail is slightly darker than the body, and is without spines or fur for its last third. Reports exist of white forms of this species. Young look similar to adults.

DISTRIBUTION

East-central to northeastern Brazil.

HABITAT

Primarily evergreen forests.

BEHAVIOR

Sightings are limited, but probably nocturnal and arboreal. FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

A mainly herbivorous animal that eats fruits and roots, but will also eat any pupae.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Little known, but a typical litter likely numbers one. Young are precocial, born with hair and soft quills, which quickly stiffen to provide a level of defense.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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