Bearded saki

Chiropotes satanas

SUBFAMILY

Pitheciinae

TAXONOMY

Chiropotes satanas Hoffmannsegg, 1807, Brazil.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Black bearded saki; French: Saki noire; Spanish: Capuchino del Orinoco, mono capuchino.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Male head and body length is 15.7-18.9 in (400-480 mm); tail length is 15.6-16.1 in (395-410 mm); and weight is 4.8-8.8 lb (2.2-4.0 kg). Female head and body length is 15.0-16.1 in (380-410 mm); tail length is 14.6-16.5 in (370-420 mm); and weight is 4.2-7.3 lb (1.9-3.3 kg). They possess a prominent black beard, temporal swellings, and long, bushy, non-prehensile tail. The coat is black with a brownish red back.

DISTRIBUTION

Guiana Shield forests north of the Amazon River and east of the Rios Negro and Orinoco and south of the Amazon east of the Rio Xingu.

HABITAT

Terra firme forest, igapó, high rainforest, and mountain savanna forest.

BEHAVIOR

Diurnal and arboreal. They live in multimale/multifemale groups of 10-30 individuals, and forages in the middle and upper canopy. The tail is wagged when excited, and they use distinctive, high-pitched whistling vocalization.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Seed predators specializing in large, heavily protected fruit; they also eat fruit pulp and some insects.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Variable mating system. Females exhibit bright red labia during estrus, and give birth to a single offspring from December to April.

CONSERVATION STATUS

The IUCN lists the Uta Hick's bearded saki (Chiropotes satanas utahicki) as Vulnerable due to habitat loss and the southern bearded saki (C. satanas satanas) as Endangered due to habitat loss and the fragmenting and decline of population sizes.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

0 0

Post a comment