Banded leafmonkey

Presbytis melalophos

SUBFAMILY Colobinae

TAXONOMY

Presbytis melalophos (Raffles, 1821), Sumatra, Indonesia. This species was originally combined with two forms that are now regarded as separate species: Presbytis femoralis and Presbytis sia-mensis. Following separation from these two species, the more narrowly defined Presbytis melalophos includes three subspecies.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Mitered leaf-monkey, Sumatran surili; French: Semnopitheque melalophe; German: Roter Langur; Spanish: Langur de cresta.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

There is considerable variation in coat coloration between subspecies. Fur ranges from off-white/gray through reddish orange to chocolate dorsally and from white through cream to pale orange ventrally. There is relatively little sexual dimorphism in body size, with males being only slightly bigger than females. Head and body length: 19.5 in (49.0 cm) for males and 20 in (49.5 cm) for females; tail length: 28.5 in (71.0 cm) for males and 28.5 in (71.0 cm) for females. Body mass: 14 lb 8 oz (6.59 kg) for males and 14lb 4 oz (6.47 kg) for females.

DISTRIBUTION

Restricted to the southern part of Sumatra. HABITAT

Primarily inhabits primary lowland rainforest, but also occurs in plantations and forest subject to logging.

BEHAVIOR

Diurnal and arboreal. Social groups are variable in composition. The species commonly lives in relatively small one-male groups, but larger multi-male groups also occur. Home ranges overlap and no overt territorial behavior is shown. As is typical for most Old World monkeys, males migrate from the natal group at maturity, but some females also migrate.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feed on items from a wide range of tree species, consuming young leaves, mature leaves, flowers, seeds and fruits. This is one of the exceptional leaf-monkey species that includes less than 50% of leaves in its diet and therefore does not fit the standard definition of "folivory."

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Polygynous. Births are typically single. This species has scarcely been studied in captivity, so little is known about its reproduction and the gestation period is unknown.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Listed as Lower Risk/Near Threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

Occurs quite frequently in plantations. Frequently hunted for bushmeat. ♦

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