TM

A large-eared slit-faced bat (Nycteris macrotis) in flight with young. (Photo by Merlin D. Tuttle, Bat Conservation International. Reproduced by permission.)

A slit-faced bat's (Nycteris sp.) arm joints with wing membrane. (Photo by Bruce Davidson/Naturepl.com Reproduced by permission.)

A female Egyptian split-faced bat (Nycteris thebaica) holding her young. (Photo by Manuel Ruedi. Reproduced by permission.)

A large-eared slit-faced bat (Nycteris macrotis) nursing her young. (Photo by Merlin D. Tuttle, Bat Conservation International. Reproduced by permission.)

they may not depend upon to find their prey, relying instead on sound cues such as the songs or footfalls of prey. Slit-faced bats also take flying prey. Accumulations of discarded pieces of prey under feeding roosts provide biologists with a picture of the diets of slit-faced bats. Unlike other species of bat, slit-faced bats are warm-blooded and cannot enter torpor, a state of total inactivity.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment