Eastern horseshoe bat

Rhinolophus megaphyllus

TAXONOMY

Rhinolophus megaphyllus Gray, 1834, New South Wales, Australia.

OTHER COMMON NAMES English: Smaller horseshoe bat.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Head and body length 1.7-2.1 in (4.4-5.3 cm); tail 0.9-1.1 in (2.2-2.8 cm); forearm 1.8-1.9 in (4.45-4.9 cm); weight 0.2-0.4 oz (7-10.5 g). Fur grayish brown, lighter on belly; wings pinkish gray. Rufous form occurs in Queensland, Australia.

DISTRIBUTION

Thailand, Malaysia, Moluccas, New Guinea, Lesser Sunda Islands, and east coast of Australia.

HABITAT

Tropical and temperate rainforest, deciduous vine forest, scle-rophyll forest, open woodland, coastal scrub, and grassland.

BEHAVIOR

Roosts in caves, mines, rock outcrops, abandoned buildings, and road culverts. Colonies usually small (fewer than 20 individuals), but in nonbreeding season may reach 2,000 individuals. In temperate regions, disperse in winter to roost singly in torpid state; in tropics, active all year.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Eats mainly moths, also bugs, beetles, flies, and wasps. Flight slow and fluttery; can hover, and maneuver through dense fo-

I Rhinolophus rouxii I Rhinolophus megaphyllus liage. Also flycatch from a perch, and glean spiders from ground; often use feeding perch.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Females congregate in maternity colonies of 15-2,000 individuals in spring and summer, in warm, humid caves. Sperm produced February-March; copulation, ovulation and fertilization late June; gestation 4-4.5 months; single young born in November. Young nursed for about 8 weeks; fully grown at 5-6 weeks. Species thought to be polygynous.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not globally threatened; widespread and apparently locally common.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment