Blocks for histology

The histology should represent the tumour, its deepest extent, the relationship to the bony, mucosal and deep soft tissue margins and changes in adjacent tissues (Figures 13.3, 14.1 and 14.2).

Alveolar process

Palatal vault

Teeth

Teeth

Palatal vault

Tumour a

Anterior part of orbital floor

Tumour

Upper buccal sulcus

Infraorbital margin

Alveolar process with teeth

Upper buccal sulcus

Infraorbital margin

Cut surface of zygomatic process

Tumour within sinus

Tuberosity

Inferior turbinate Palatal vault

Inferior turbinate Palatal vault

Lateral wall of maxillary sinus Upper buccal sulcus

Tumour c

Lateral wall of maxillary sinus Upper buccal sulcus

Tumour a b c

Figure 14.1. Left maxillectomy specimen for carcinoma. Suggested siting and orientation of tissue blocks for maxillectomy specimens. (a) View of palatal aspect. (b) View from lateral aspect. (c) View of transverse cut surface.

Sigmoid notch

Lingula and inferior alveolar nerve foramen (on lingual side)

-Coronoid process v..

External oblique ridge

Molar and premolar teeth

Mental foramen

Radiographic extent of lesion

Lingula and inferior alveolar nerve foramen

^— —-

1

5

Sigmoid Coronoid Mental notch process foramen b a v..

Figure 14.2. Right hemimandibulectomy for ameloblastoma. Suggested siting and orientation of tissue blocks for hemi-mandibulectomy for ameloblastoma or other intrabony tumour. (a) View from lateral aspect. (b) View from above.

• at least one block of tumour per centimetre diameter.

• abnormal areas of distant bone or mucosa.

• anterior and posterior surgical bone margins as transverse sections.

• mucosal and deep soft tissue and neurovascular surgical margins.

If other specimens are attached as an "in-continuity dissection" (e.g., mucosa, skin, lymph nodes, etc.), these can be cut separately in the usual fashion.

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