The Life Span of Yeast

The chronological life span is determined by measuring the survival time of populations of nondividing yeast. Alternatively, yeast life span is measured by monitoring the replicative potential of single mother cells. Each system has led to the identification of genes involved in either chronological or replicative aging (Bitterman et al., 2003). The activity of the products of some of these genes (SCH9, CYR1; see The Genetics of Chronological Aging: Yeast Methuselah Genes) consistently affects both replicative and chronological life span (Fabrizio et al., 2004b). Conversely, some genes encoding for stress resistance proteins (MSN2, SOD1/2) promote chronological longevity but negatively affect replicative life span, suggesting that there is only a partial overlap between the mechanisms that regulate replicative potential and survival of postmitotic yeast (Fabrizio et al., 2004b). In the following section we review both paradigms with emphasis on the chronological life span.

How to Stay Young

How to Stay Young

For centuries, ever since the legendary Ponce de Leon went searching for the elusive Fountain of Youth, people have been looking for ways to slow down the aging process. Medical science has made great strides in keeping people alive longer by preventing and curing disease, and helping people to live healthier lives. Average life expectancy keeps increasing, and most of us can look forward to the chance to live much longer lives than our ancestors.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment