Walls

The most commonly used wall material is masonry blocks coated with block filler to eliminate pits and sealed with epoxy paint. This wall performs well in most areas of the facility, with the exception of

Figure 8.10 Shown are dogs that are being held individually when fed, which corresponds to the indoor pens noted in Figure 8.8. This strategy ensures that dogs housed in groups for most of the day may be fed without disturbances from fellow dogs. It also allows caretakers to identify if some dogs have a decreased appetite.

Figure 8.10 Shown are dogs that are being held individually when fed, which corresponds to the indoor pens noted in Figure 8.8. This strategy ensures that dogs housed in groups for most of the day may be fed without disturbances from fellow dogs. It also allows caretakers to identify if some dogs have a decreased appetite.

Figure 8.11 Indoor pen for dogs, which corresponds to the indoor pens noted on Figure 8.8. Wood shavings are spread on the floor to facilitate cleaning. Note the door on the right side of the picture connecting the indoor pen with the outdoor pen.

high-moisture areas, such as animal rooms in which hose-down caging systems are used, and cage sanitation areas, where coatings tend to peel from the block. Structural glazed facing blocks, or ceramic tiles over a water-resistant foundation, in which the grout is top dressed with epoxy, makes a maintenance-free wall that performs exceptionally well in these high-moisture areas as does masonry block covered with mineral fiber composite panels. Gypsum board on studs has rarely proved suitable for any area of an animal facility. However, newer sheet materials made of a variety of mineral fiber composite panels mounted directly on metal studs or in combination with fiberglass-reinforced gypsum board on stud walls is a viable alternative in many areas of the facility. Such walls are especially useful in earthquake-prone locations.

Protective guardrails or wall curbs are required in corridors and may also be cost-effective in animal rooms and other areas, where wall damage from caging and other equipment is likely. Guardrails should be sturdy, sanitizable, and constructed to avoid providing harborage for cockroaches and other pests. Extruded solid aluminum rails fastened to the wall with I-beam standoffs have proved very useful in animal facilities (Figures 8.15 and 8.16). Guardrail height should be carefully matched to the equipment

Figure 8.12 Cabinets are provided in the indoor kennels for dogs, noted in Figure 8.8, where they may sleep (bottom) or sit (top).

Figure 8.13 View of an outdoor dog pen that corresponds to the same in Figure 8.8. Note the large space provided for a few dogs.

used in the facility. A double row of guardrails may be provided; however, if there is to be only one row, its height should be determined by a careful examination of the rolling equipment to routinely be used in the facility.

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