Vaccination

If all other measures are unsuccessful or impossible to apply, the use of animals protected by vaccination may be considered. If vaccination is unavoidable, one should in the first place consider whether it might be sufficient to vaccinate the female breeding animals only, as passive immunization through maternal antibodies in most cases must be considered as less interfering with research than active immunization of the experimental animal. Apart from this, it is easier and cheaper. In this way, pneumonia due to B. bronchiseptica may be almost totally eliminated from breeding colonies of guinea pigs, although the agent still persists in the colony.233 Vaccination of the experimental animals has been used against Sendai virus pneumonia,234,235,236 ectromelia,237 mycoplasmosis,238,239 and the various effects of infection with cytomegalovirus.240 Especially for larger laboratory animals, such as pigs, this is a common way of dealing with infectious problems.241 However, in regard to infections, which the animal colony can actually be kept free of, vaccination should be considered bad practice. Some of the unwanted microbial effects on research may be seen even in vaccinated animals, e.g., the immunosuppressive effect of Sendai virus.242

Figure 11.6 The outside of two separated barrier units. The shower entrance of barrier 1 is closest followed by a diptank for chemical disinfection into barrier 1, autoclave for barrier 1, autoclave for barrier 2, diptank for barrier 1, shower entrance and chemical disinfection lock for barrier 2 (M&B Ltd, Denmark).

Figure 11.6 The outside of two separated barrier units. The shower entrance of barrier 1 is closest followed by a diptank for chemical disinfection into barrier 1, autoclave for barrier 1, autoclave for barrier 2, diptank for barrier 1, shower entrance and chemical disinfection lock for barrier 2 (M&B Ltd, Denmark).

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