Helicobacter spp

Helicobacter spp. have been isolated from nearly all species of rodents,32 but clinical significance has only been documented in relation to a few of these. H. hepaticus and maybe also H. bilis cause chronic hepatitis in mice.32 H. hepaticus is probably also responsible for liver tumors in mice.32 Susceptibility to disease seems to be genetically dependent, e.g., A/JCr33 and B6C3F34 mice seem to be highly susceptible, while C57BL33 mice seem to be resistant. H. cholecystus causes hepatitis and pancreatitis in hamsters. Infection with Helicobacter spp. is probably rather common in rodent colonies.32,35 A range of transgenic mice as well as some rats suffer from a syndrome consisting of gastric ulcers, colitis, proctitis, and rectal prolapses (Figure 11.3), which in its features resembles several aspects of human inflammatory bowel disease. The syndrome is primarily observed in strains in which transgenesis has disrupted the normal mucosal homeostasis by features such as cytokine imbalance, abrogation of oral

Table 11.1 Important Bacterial and Fungal Infections Observed in Mice (M), Rats (R), Guinea Pigs (GP), Syrian or Chinese Hamsters (H), and Rabbits (RB)

Gram-Negative Bacteria

Table 11.1 Important Bacterial and Fungal Infections Observed in Mice (M), Rats (R), Guinea Pigs (GP), Syrian or Chinese Hamsters (H), and Rabbits (RB)

Gram-Negative Bacteria

Bordetella bronchiseptica

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