Administrative Training and Personnel Health and Hygiene

Managing an animal facility is a complex business that requires the coordinated effort of a variety of staff, many of whom require office space, including professional, management, supervisory, training, and clerical staff. It is highly desirable to provide the administrative and training space in a consolidated suite adjacent to the animal facility but outside of the security perimeter. The suite should include space for office equipment and storage of office supplies and files and amenities such as an office kitchen unit. This is also a highly desirable location to place the training space. Given the importance of training,

Figure 8.2 Schematics of four basic types of circulation patterns. The arrows indicate the direction of cage traffic between the animal rooms and the cage sanitation area. "A" illustrates a single-corridor bidirectional pattern. "B" illustrates a single-corridor unidirectional pattern. "C" illustrates a dual-corridor pattern with relatively large animal rooms. "D" illustrates a dual-corridor pattern with relatively small animal rooms. All four are drawn within the same footprint to illustrate the relative "cost" of the different circulation patterns and small versus large animal room sizes in terms of the ratio of corridor space to corridor plus animal room space. The percentages only serve to illustrate the significance of choosing a combination of circulation patterns and animal room sizes, and do not necessarily apply to a particular plan.

Figure 8.2 Schematics of four basic types of circulation patterns. The arrows indicate the direction of cage traffic between the animal rooms and the cage sanitation area. "A" illustrates a single-corridor bidirectional pattern. "B" illustrates a single-corridor unidirectional pattern. "C" illustrates a dual-corridor pattern with relatively large animal rooms. "D" illustrates a dual-corridor pattern with relatively small animal rooms. All four are drawn within the same footprint to illustrate the relative "cost" of the different circulation patterns and small versus large animal room sizes in terms of the ratio of corridor space to corridor plus animal room space. The percentages only serve to illustrate the significance of choosing a combination of circulation patterns and animal room sizes, and do not necessarily apply to a particular plan.

for animal care and animal use staff, such space should have high priority. It should include space for conferencing and training, training equipment, and storage of library and training materials. Space for animal procedure training may best be located in the animal facility. Animal technician supervisor offices may be in the administrative suite or scattered throughout animal housing areas, depending on the size of the facility. Office space for veterinary technicians may be located inside the surgery suite or in the diagnostic laboratory space, which may also be included inside the administrative suite.

A safe, efficient, and healthy working environment must be provided for personnel working in the facility.8 The primary safety issues are animal allergens, infectious agents, chemical hazards, and physical hazards. To protect personnel and animals and to reduce the potential for transporting hazardous agents

Table 8.1 Advantages and Disadvantages of Dual Corridors as Compared with Single Corridors

Advantages of Dual Corridors

The separation of clean cages and supplies from soiled cages and trash eliminates the potential for cross contamination in the corridors.

They facilitate the flow of supplies and cages through the facility.

They allow for reduced congestion in the corridors.

Disadvantages of Dual Corridors

The higher ratio of circulation space to animal room and support space is costly.

Labor costs are higher when managed to maintain a strict unidirectional flow of personnel between clean and soiled sides.

The additional door in the animal room limits room layout options and decreases space utilization efficiency.

Comment

The smaller the animal rooms, the higher the space cost of dual corridors, and vice versa.

The potential for airborne cross contamination from the corridor to the room is similar for dual- and single-corridor configurations.

Contamination control is the primary issue. Most would agree that a dual corridor system is the best model for contamination control; however, effective contamination control can be provided in a single-corridor system by using an appropriate combination of management procedures and equipment options.

Which is the most cost effective? The answer to that question depends on the individual situation and how much weight is put on the various advantages and disadvantages.

between home and the animal facility, animal care technicians are required to wear work uniforms, and other personnel working the facility are typically required to at least wear protective outer garments prior to entering animal rooms. All uniforms and protective outerwear are provided and laundered by the facility. In addition, eating and drinking are not permitted in animal housing areas or in most support areas. To accommodate these requirements, support facilities should include lavatory, shower, locker rooms, and a break area. A laundry room for laundering uniforms and surgical linens is useful, even if a commercial laundry service is to be used. In addition, amenities and aesthetic considerations throughout the facility and especially in the break area that make for a quality work environment and enhance the recruitment and retention of staff should be provided.

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