Axial View Coronal View Sagittal View

FIGURE 5 (a) Axial and sagittal views of the bounding box after manual adjustment to match the bounding limits of the cerebrum. The anterior, posterior, left, right, superior, and inferior bounds are illustrated; however, bounds do not generally fall within any one section view of the brain (e.g., posterior bound in axial view and inferior bound in sagittal view). (b) Axial, coronal, and sagittal views of the bounding box limits for the inferior margin of the temporal lobe. The cross-hairs for each view intersect at the limit. For this inferior brain boundary the axial view of the most inferior indication of temporal lobe tissue is considered the limiting boundary. The coronal and sagittal views are used for verification. See also Plate 80.

FIGURE 5 (a) Axial and sagittal views of the bounding box after manual adjustment to match the bounding limits of the cerebrum. The anterior, posterior, left, right, superior, and inferior bounds are illustrated; however, bounds do not generally fall within any one section view of the brain (e.g., posterior bound in axial view and inferior bound in sagittal view). (b) Axial, coronal, and sagittal views of the bounding box limits for the inferior margin of the temporal lobe. The cross-hairs for each view intersect at the limit. For this inferior brain boundary the axial view of the most inferior indication of temporal lobe tissue is considered the limiting boundary. The coronal and sagittal views are used for verification. See also Plate 80.

FIGURE 6 In the axial view the anterior commissure (AC) posterior commissure (PC) appear as thin white lines connecting white matter between hemispheres. In the sagittal view the AC is a conspicuous white, slightly elliptical structure, and the PC is at the elbow between the pineal body (pb) and superior colliculus (sc). See also Plate 81.

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