Pelvic Girdle and Lower Limb

Part A

Complete the following statements: 1. The pelvic girdle consists of two

2. The head of the femur articulates with the_

3. The_is the largest portion of the coxal bone.

of the coxal bone.

4. The distance between the

_ represents the shortest diameter of the pelvic outlet.

5. The pubic bones come together anteriorly to form the joint called the_.

6. The_is the superior margin of the ilium that causes the prominence of the hip.

of the ischium supports the weight of the body.

8. The angle formed by the pubic bones below the symphysis pubis is called the

9. _is the largest foramen in the skeleton.

10. The ilium joins the sacrum at the_joint.

Part B

Match the bones in column A with the features in column B. Place the letter of your choice in the space provided.

Column A

a. femur b. fibula c. metatarsals d. patella e. phalanges f. tarsals g. tibia

Column B

1. middle phalanx

2. lesser trochanter

3. medial malleolus

4. fovea capitis

5. calcaneus

6. lateral cuneiform

7. tibial tuberosity

8. talus

9. linea aspera

10. lateral malleolus

11. sesamoid bone

12. five bones that form the instep

Part C

Identify the bones and features indicated in the radiographs (X rays) of figures 16.7, 16.8, and 16.9. Figure 16.7 Identify the bones and features indicated on this radiograph (X ray) of the pelvic region.

Fovea Capitis Radiograph

Figure 16.8 Identify the bones and features indicated on this radiograph of the knee. (bone) ^

Fovea Capitis Radiograph

Figure 16.9 Identify the bones indicated on this radiograph of the left foot.

Figure 16.9 Identify the bones indicated on this radiograph of the left foot.

Foot Kangaroo Skeleton
Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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