Demonstration

A stereomicroscope (dissecting microscope) (fig. 3.6) is useful for observing the details of relatively large, opaque specimens. Although this type of microscope achieves less magnification than a compound microscope, it has the advantage of producing a three-dimensional image rather than the flat, two-dimensional image of the compound microscope. In addition, the image produced by the stereomicroscope is positioned in the same manner as the specimen, rather than being reversed and inverted as it is by the compound microscope.

Observe the stereomicroscope. Note that the eyepieces can be pushed apart or together to fit the distance between your eyes. Focus the microscope on the end of your finger. Which way does the image move when you move your finger to the right? _

When you move it away? _

If the instrument has more than one objective, change the magnification to higher power. Use the instrument to examine various small, opaque objects available in the laboratory.

Figure 3.6 A stereomicroscope, which is also called a dissecting microscope.

Interpupillary adjustment

Eyepiece focusing (diopter) adjustment

Body

Figure 3.6 A stereomicroscope, which is also called a dissecting microscope.

Body

Labeling Dissecting Microscope

Focusing knob

Top (incident) illuminator

Switch

Base with bottom

(transmitting)

illuminator

Focusing knob

Top (incident) illuminator

Switch

Base with bottom

(transmitting)

illuminator

Stage plate

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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