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a test, and did not intend to, were classified as 'non test-takers'. The demographic profile of these respondents is compared in table 9. Non test-takers were very significantly more likely to be single (including divorced or separated) than living with or married to a partner (chi-sq (1) = 10.7, p<.01). This finding was consistent with the impression gained by the midwives working locally that male partners were often keener on taking up the opportunity for this test than the mothers, suggesting that some interesting dynamics may underlie decision-making by parents on genetic screening, and thus merits future research attention. It will be noted that there was a (non-significant) trend towards rejection of the test being more likely in women experiencing a first pregnancy or baby. This may be due to a greater concern amongst mothers with existing childcare responsibilities about the implications of having a baby with special needs.

As can be seen from table 10, there was a (non-significant) trend towards those who had or would choose to take the test being more likely to report that they felt they had received enough information about the test, and that they had talked to someone about the

Table 5. Uptake of Down's syndrome screening test

Number %

"Will you have the blood test for Down's syndrome screening?"

Table 5. Uptake of Down's syndrome screening test

Number %

"Will you have the blood test for Down's syndrome screening?"

Yes

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