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Source: After D. S. Falconer, Introduction to Quantitative Genetics (London: Longman, 1981), p. 284.

Source: After D. S. Falconer, Introduction to Quantitative Genetics (London: Longman, 1981), p. 284.

characteristic, and these genes also affect the second characteristic, causing it to change at the same time. Correlated responses may well be undesirable and may limit the ability to alter a characteristic by selection. From 1944 to 1964, domestic turkeys were subjected to intense selection for growth rate and body size. At the same time, fertility, egg production, and egg hatchability all declined. These correlated responses were due to negative genetic correlations between body size and fertility; eventually, these genetic correlations limited the extent to which the growth rate of turkeys could respond to selection. Genetic correlations may also limit the ability of natural populations to respond to selection in the wild and adapt to their environments.

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