Visual Acuity

Uncomplicated papilledema of moderate duration and degree does not interfere with visual acuity. Clearly, acute papilledema with a hemorrhage into the macular area will diminish visual acuity.

Severe and long-standing papilledema can produce optic atrophy and blindness. In the chronically compressed optic nerve both glial cells and small vessels proliferate, and if the swelling is severe, necrosis of the nerve may occur.

Retina Lamina Optic nerve

Figure 3-1. A. Cross-section of the normal eye. The optic disc is on the nasal side of the macula, which is in the posterior pole of the eye. B. Profile of the optic nerve, disc, cup, and subarachnoid space surrounding the nerve.

B Dura Pia Arachnoid

Figure 3-1. A. Cross-section of the normal eye. The optic disc is on the nasal side of the macula, which is in the posterior pole of the eye. B. Profile of the optic nerve, disc, cup, and subarachnoid space surrounding the nerve.

Retina displaced laterally by swollen nerve head
Figure 3-2. A. Cross-section of the eye with papilledema. The nerve head is expanded forward and, as seen in more detail in B, spreads laterally, displacing the retina. B. The edematous optic nerve head is expanded forward and laterally. The retina is displaced and wrinkled.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment