Cognitive Therapy for Eating Disorders

Only more recently has cognitive therapy been adapted for eating disorders (Vitousek, 1996). In their review of eight outcome studies, Compas et al. (1998) concluded that cognitive therapy for bulimia nervosa meets criteria for an efficacious approach, although effectiveness research suggests that on average only 55 % are in full remission at follow up. A recent multi-site study has broadly replicated these findings (Agras et al., 2000). It is premature to comment on cognitive therapy for anorexia nervosa as, although several adaptations have been suggested (Vitousek, Watson & Wilson, 1998), there is very limited research attesting to its efficacy or effectiveness to date.

Breaking Bulimia

Breaking Bulimia

We have all been there: turning to the refrigerator if feeling lonely or bored or indulging in seconds or thirds if strained. But if you suffer from bulimia, the from time to time urge to overeat is more like an obsession.

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