Meningioma on CT

Radiology For Meningiomas
Fig. 11.13a A noncontrast head CT study clearly depicts the meningioma originating from the falx cerebri. b The bone window demonstrates partial calcification of the lesion.

I Meningioma on MR Imaging

I Meningioma on MR Imaging

Noncontrast Head Calcification

Fig. 11.14a and b On T2-weighted (a) and noncontrast T1-weighted (b) MR images you recognize a sphenoid wing meningioma only after a careful analysis of the anatomy. The T2 sequence does not show any associated edema. The soft tissue component is isointense to the cerebral parenchyma (arrow). The adjacent sphenoid wing is expanded and sclerotic. c After

Fig. 11.14a and b On T2-weighted (a) and noncontrast T1-weighted (b) MR images you recognize a sphenoid wing meningioma only after a careful analysis of the anatomy. The T2 sequence does not show any associated edema. The soft tissue component is isointense to the cerebral parenchyma (arrow). The adjacent sphenoid wing is expanded and sclerotic. c After contrast administration, the situation becomes much clearer: The soft tissue component enhances markedly and is easily differentiated from surrounding normal brain parenchyma. However, the tumor is now almost impossible to distinguish from the orbital fat because no fat-suppression technique was used when this study was acquired!

at all after contrast administration (Fig. 11.16a). Morphological differentiation from an infarction is not always possible without a follow-up examination. Grade 3 astrocytomas are also called anaplastic astrocytomas. They are tumors of the middle-aged adult. Their margins tend to be diffuse; they are surrounded by considerable edema and accumulate contrast inho-mogeneously.

The grade 4 astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary malignant brain tumor. It predominates in older adults. It is characterized by a pronounced perifocal edema, an intense and frequently serpiginous contrast enhancement, large central necroses, and an unsharp contour (Fig. 11.16b). The lesion is difficult to differentiate from an abscess on purely morphological grounds. The tumor has an infiltrative growth pattern and can rarely be resected completely. The part of the tumor that is visible on diagnostic imaging unfortunately represents only the "tip of the iceberg"; at the time of diagnosis, tumor cells have virtually

I Oligodendroglioma

I Oligodendroglioma

Noncontrast Head Calcification
Fig. 11.15 a Noncontrast head CT demonstrates a mass in the right frontal lobe with obvious perifocal edema containing coarse calcifications. b After contrast administration, the lesion enhances in an inhomogeneous fashion. This combination of

findings is highly suggestive of an oligodendroglioma. c The T2-weighted MR image confirms the presence of white-matter edema; the central components of poor signal in the tumor correspond to the calcifications seen on CT.

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Responses

  • Jesse
    Why does the falx up on a noncontrast ct?
    5 years ago
  • retu
    Why does a brain tumor show up on non contrast ct?
    4 years ago
  • thomas
    How to contour meningioma?
    3 years ago

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