Cross Sectional Anatomy of the Brain

I. INTRODUCTION. The illustrations in this chapter are accompanied by corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Together they represent a mini-atlas of brain slices in the three orthogonal planes (i.e., midsagittal, coronal, and axial). An insert on each figure shows the level of the slice. The most commonly tested structures are labeled.

II. MIDSAGITTAL SECTION (Figures 1-1, 1-2, and 1-3). The location of the structures shown in the figures should be known.

Mid Sagittal Brain Fornix

Fornix (column) Interventricular foramen

Septum pellucidum

Corpus callosum Thalamus

Motor strip

Anterior commissure

Lamina terminalis Third ventricle

Optic chiasm Hypophysis

Central sulcus Sensory strip

Mamillary body CN

Cerebral aqueduct

Pineal body

Superior and inferior colliculi (tectum)

Calcarine sulcus

Fourth ventricle

Cerebellum (vermis) Medulla oblongata

Figure 1-1. Midsagittal section of the brain and brain stem showing the structures surrounding the third and fourth ventricles. The brain stem includes the midbrain (M), pons (P), and medulla oblongata.

Coronal Brain Stem Anatomy

Cingulate gyrus

Superior frontal gyrus

Anterior cerebral artery Crista galli Basilar artery Sphenoid sinus Clivis Nasopharynx C2

Paracentral lobule

Superior sagittal sinus Parietooccipital fissure Vein of Galen Cuneus Straight sinus Calcarine fissure Lingual gyrus Diploe

Cerebellar vermis Cisterna cerebellomedullaris

Figure 1-2. Midsagittal magnetic resonance imaging section through the brain and brain stem showing the important structures surrounding the third and fourth ventricles. This is a T1-weighted image. The gray matter is gray (hypointensc), whereas the white matter is white (hyperintense).

Corpus callosum Lateral ventricle

Anterior cerebral artery

Optic chiasm Hypophysis/infundibulum

Mamillary body Cerebral aqueduct

Figure 1-3. Midsagittal magnetic resonance imaging section through the brain stem and diencephalon. Note the cerebrospinal fluid tract: lateral ventricle, interventricular foramen of Monro, third ventricle, cerebral aqueduct, fourth ventricle, foramen of Magendie, cerebellomedullary cistern, and spinal subarachnoid space. Note also the relation between the optic chiasm, infundibulum, and hypophysis (pituitary gland).

Fornix

Thalamus

Third Ventricle Radiological Anatomy

Cisterna cerebellomedullaris

Spinal cord Subarachnoid space

Figure 1-3. Midsagittal magnetic resonance imaging section through the brain stem and diencephalon. Note the cerebrospinal fluid tract: lateral ventricle, interventricular foramen of Monro, third ventricle, cerebral aqueduct, fourth ventricle, foramen of Magendie, cerebellomedullary cistern, and spinal subarachnoid space. Note also the relation between the optic chiasm, infundibulum, and hypophysis (pituitary gland).

Fornix

Thalamus

Vein of Galen Pineal gland

Superior and inferior colliculi Fourth ventricle

Cerebellar vermis

Cisterna cerebellomedullaris

Spinal cord Subarachnoid space

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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Responses

  • Harry
    Which of the ventricles is located directly superior to the cisterna cerebellomedullaris?
    6 years ago
  • delmo
    Where is the superior cerebal vein located in the brain?
    4 years ago
  • ute bach
    Which of the ventricles is located directly superior to the cistern cerebellomedullaris?
    4 years ago

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