Ure 738

Figure

Superior view of (a) a cervical vertebra, (b) a thoracic vertebra, and (c) a lumbar vertebra.

Coccyx

The coccyx (kok'siks), or tailbone, is the lowest part of the vertebral column and is usually composed of four vertebrae that fuse by the twenty-fifth year. Ligaments attach it to the margins of the sacral hiatus (see fig. 7.39). Sitting presses on the coccyx and it moves forward, acting like a shock absorber. Sitting down with great force, as when slipping and falling on ice, can fracture or dislocate the coccyx. Table 7.9 summarizes the bones of the vertebral

Sacral promontory

Superior articular process

Figure 7.39

(a) Anterior view of the sacrum and coccyx. (b) Posterior view.

Sacral canal

Sacrum

Pelvic sacral foramen

Figure 7.39

(a) Anterior view of the sacrum and coccyx. (b) Posterior view.

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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