Ure 164

Figure

Lymphatic vessels merge into larger lymphatic trunks, which in turn drain into collecting ducts.

Figure 16.5

A lymphangiogram (radiograph) of the lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes of the pelvic region.

limbs, lower abdominal wall, and pelvic organs; the intestinal trunk drains the abdominal viscera; the intercostal and bronchomediastinal trunks drain lymph from portions of the thorax; the subclavian trunk drains the upper limb; and the jugular trunk drains portions of the neck and head. These lymphatic trunks then join one of two collecting ducts—the thoracic duct or the right lymphatic duct. Figure 16.4 shows the location of the major lymphatic trunks and collecting ducts, and figure 16.5 shows a lymphangiogram, or radiograph, of some lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes.

The thoracic duct is the larger and longer of the two collecting ducts. It begins in the abdomen, passes upward through the diaphragm beside the aorta, ascends anterior to the vertebral column through the mediastinum, and empties into the left subclavian vein near the junction of the left jugular vein. This duct drains lymph from the intestinal, lumbar, and intercostal trunks, as well as from the left subclavian, left jugular, and left bronchomediastinal trunks.

The right lymphatic duct originates in the right thorax at the union of the right jugular, right subclavian, and

Right internal jugular vein Right lymphatic duct Right subclavian

Axillary lymph nodes

Lymphatics of mammary gland

Axillary lymph nodes

Lymphatics of mammary gland

Right lymphatic duct

Lymph nodes

Lymphatic trunks

Lymphatic vessels

Left internal jugular vein

Thoracic duct

Left subclavian vein

Thoracic duct

Cisterna chyli

Area drained by right lymphatic duct

Right lymphatic duct

Lymph nodes

Lymphatic trunks

Lymphatic vessels

Left internal jugular vein

Thoracic duct

Left subclavian vein

Thoracic duct

Cisterna chyli

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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