Touch and Pressure Senses

The senses of touch and pressure derive from three kinds of receptors (fig. 12.1). As a group, these receptors sense mechanical forces that deform or displace tissues. The touch and pressure receptors include the following:

1. Free nerve endings. These receptors are common in epithelial tissues, where they lie between epithelial cells. They are associated with sensations of touch and pressure.

2. Meissner's corpuscles. These are small, oval masses of flattened connective tissue cells in connective tissue sheaths. Two or more sensory nerve fibers branch into each corpuscle and end within it as tiny knobs.

Meissner's corpuscles are abundant in the hairless portions of the skin, such as the lips,

Epidermis -

Dermis -

Epidermis -

Dermis -

Free nerve endings

Meissner's corpuscles

Pacinian corpuscles

Sensory nerve fibers

Figure

Touch and pressure receptors include free ends of sensory nerve fibers, Meissner's corpuscles, and Pacinian corpuscles.

Free nerve endings

Meissner's corpuscles

Pacinian corpuscles

Sensory nerve fibers

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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Responses

  • jenni karppinen
    What endings in the epithelial tissues are associated with touch and pressure?
    4 years ago

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