Muscles that Move the Foot

Movements of the foot include movements of the ankle and toes. A number of muscles that move the foot are located in the leg. They attach the femur, tibia, and fibula to bones of the foot and are responsible for moving the foot upward (dorsiflexion) or downward (plantar flexion) and turning the foot so the toes are inward (inversion) or outward (eversion). These muscles are shown in figures 9.39, 9.40, 9.41, 9.42, in reference plates 68, 69, 70, and are listed in table 9.14. Muscles that move the foot include the following:

Dorsal Flexors

Tibialis anterior Peroneus tertius Extensor digitorum longus

Plantar Flexors

Gastrocnemius Soleus

Flexor digitorum longus

Invertor

Tibialis posterior

Evertor

Peroneuslongus

Tibialis anterior

Peroneus longus

Extensor digitorum longus

Peroneus brevis

Fibularis LongusBlood Vessels The Foot

Figure 9.39

(a) Muscles of the anterior right leg. (b-d) Isolated views of muscles associated with the anterior leg.

Patella

Patellar ligament Gastrocnemius

Patella

Tibialis anterior

Peroneus longus

Extensor digitorum longus

Peroneus brevis

Muscles The Leg And Foot
Extensor digitorum longus
Blood Vessels The Foot

Figure 9.39

(a) Muscles of the anterior right leg. (b-d) Isolated views of muscles associated with the anterior leg.

Biceps femoris

Gastrocnemius -Soleus-

Peroneus longus -

oralis aula terior

Biceps femoris

Gastrocnemius -Soleus-

Peroneus longus -

Gastrocnemius

oralis aula terior

Peroneal retinacula

- Extensor digitorum longus

Peroneal retinacula

Lateral Calcaneal Blood Vessel
Peroneus brevis
Right Leg Muscles Sartorius

Figure 9.40

(a) Muscles of the lateral right leg. Isolated views of (b) peroneus longus and (c) peroneus brevis.

Semitendinosus

Semimembranosus Gracilis Sartorius

Gastrocnemius:

Medial head

Gastrocnemius:

Medial head

Semitendinosus

Semimembranosus Gracilis Sartorius

Soleus

Calcaneal tendon

Flexor digitorum longus

Calcaneus

Muscles That Move The Foot

Biceps femoris

Peroneus longus

Peroneus brevis

Peroneal retinacula

Soleus

Calcaneal tendon

Flexor digitorum longus

Flexor retinaculum

Calcaneus

Biceps femoris

Foot Blood Vessels

Gastrocnemius

Peroneus longus

Peroneus brevis

Peroneal retinacula

Gastrocnemius

Tibialis Posterior

Soleus

Tibialis Posterior Muscle
Tibialis posterior

Flexor digitorum longus

Soleus

Figure 9.41

(a) Muscles of the posterior right leg. (b-e) Isolated views of muscles associated with the posterior right leg.

Flexor digitorum longus

Flexor Digitorum Longus

Plane of section

Tibialis Posterior Site For Emg

Figure 9.42

A cross section of the leg (superior view).

Figure 9.42

A cross section of the leg (superior view).

Small saphenous v. Soleus m. Tibial n.

Posterior tibial a.

Flexor digitorum longus m.

Great saphenous v. Tibialis posterior m.

Tibia

Tibialis anterior m.

rMllH Muscles that Move

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Responses

  • georgina
    What is peroneus tertius?
    3 years ago

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