Info

Aorta

Left common iliac a.

External Iliac Lymph Nodes

Middle sacral a. Iliolumbar a.

Superior gluteal a. Lateral sacral a. Inferior gluteal a.

Internal pudendal a.

Inferior vesical a.

Perineal a. Inferior rectal a.

Inferior mesenteric a.

Inferior epigastric a.-

Right common iliac a. Internal iliac a. External iliac a. Deep circumflex iliac a.

Femoral a.

Obturator a, Superior vesical a.

Aorta

Left common iliac a.

Middle sacral a. Iliolumbar a.

Superior gluteal a. Lateral sacral a. Inferior gluteal a.

Internal pudendal a.

Inferior vesical a.

Perineal a. Inferior rectal a.

Figure 15.51

Arteries that supply the pelvic region.

branches to muscles and superficial tissues of the thigh. These branches also supply the skin of the groin and the lower abdominal wall. Important subdivisions of the femoral artery include the following:

1. Superficial circumflex iliac artery to the lymph nodes and skin of the groin.

2. Superficial epigastric artery to the skin of the lower abdominal wall.

3. Superficial and deep external pudendal arteries to the skin of the lower abdomen and external genitalia.

4. Deep femoral artery (the largest branch of the femoral artery) to the hip joint and muscles of the thigh.

5. Deep genicular artery to distal ends of thigh muscles and to an anastomosis around the knee joint.

As the femoral artery reaches the proximal border of the space behind the knee (popliteal fossa), it becomes the popliteal artery. Branches of this artery supply blood to the knee joint and to certain muscles in the thigh and calf. Also, many of its branches join the anastomosis of the knee and help provide alternate pathways for blood in the case of arterial obstructions. At the lower border of the popliteal fossa, the popliteal artery divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.

The anterior tibial (tib'e-al) artery passes downward between the tibia and the fibula, giving off branches to the skin and muscles in anterior and lateral regions of the

Right common iliac a.

Deep circumflex iliac a.

External iliac a.

Superficial circumflex iliac a.

Deep femoral a.

Lateral femoral a.

Right common iliac a.

Deep circumflex iliac a.

External iliac a.

Superficial circumflex iliac a.

Deep femoral a.

Lateral femoral a.

Abdominal aorta

- Internal iliac a.

Superficial pudendal a.

Femoral a.-

Deep genicular a.

Anterior tibial a.-

Posterior tibial a.-

Dorsalis pedis a.

Medial plantar a.-

Anterior view

Abdominal aorta

- Internal iliac a.

Superficial pudendal a.

Femoral a.-

Deep genicular a.

- Popliteal a.

Anterior tibial a.-

Posterior tibial a.-

Peroneal a.

Anterior view

Dorsalis pedis a.

Medial plantar a.-

Posterior view

- Lateral plantar a.

Figure 15.52

Main branches of the external iliac artery.

leg. It also communicates with the anastomosis of the knee and with a network of arteries around the ankle. This vessel continues into the foot as the dorsalis pedis artery, which supplies blood to the foot and toes.

The posterior tibial artery, the larger of the two popliteal branches, descends beneath the calf muscles, giving off branches to the skin, muscles, and other tissues of the leg along the way. Some of these vessels join the anastomoses of the knee and ankle. As it passes be tween the medial malleolus and the heel, the posterior tibial artery divides into the medial and lateral plantar arteries. Branches from these arteries supply blood to tissues of the heel, foot, and toes.

The largest branch of the posterior tibial artery is the peroneal artery, which travels downward along the fibula and contributes to the anastomosis of the ankle. The major vessels of the arterial system are shown in figure 15.53.

Superficial temporal a.

External carotid a. Internal carotid a Common carotid a.

Brachiocephalic a. Axillary a.

Peroneal a.

Dorsalls pedis a.

Vertebral a.

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