Arteries to the Pelvis and Lower Limb

The abdominal aorta divides to form the common iliac arteries at the level of the pelvic brim. These vessels provide blood to the pelvic organs, gluteal region, and lower limbs.

Each common iliac artery descends a short distance and divides into an internal (hypogastric) branch and an external branch. The internal iliac artery gives off numerous branches to various pelvic muscles and visceral structures, as well as to the gluteal muscles and the

Internal carotid a. External carotid a. Common carotid a. Subclavian a. (cut) Vertebral a.

Figure 15.47

An angiogram of the arteries associated with the head.

Middle Meningeal

Middle meningeal a. to meninges of brain

Internal carotid a. to arterial circle and brain

Middle meningeal a. to meninges of brain

Internal carotid a. to arterial circle and brain

Facial a. Lingual a. Thyroid a. , s Brachiocephalic a.

Cerebral arteries: Anterior Middle

Anterior communicating a.

Internal carotid a.

Pituitary gland

Figure 15.47

An angiogram of the arteries associated with the head.

Anterior communicating a.

Internal carotid a.

Pituitary gland

Basilar a.

Vertebral a.

Spinal a.

Subclavian Circle Willis Angiogram

Basilar a.

Vertebral a.

Spinal a.

Figure 15.48

View of inferior surface of the brain. The cerebral arterial circle (circle of Willis) is formed by the anterior cerebral arteries, which are connected by the anterior communicating artery, and by the posterior vertebral arteries, which are connected to the internal carotid arteries by the posterior communicating arteries.

Right common carotid a. Right subclavian a.

Axillary a. Anterior circumflex a. Posterior circumflex a. Deep brachial a. Brachial a.

Radial reçu

Radial a.

Principal artery of thumb

Right common carotid a. Right subclavian a.

Radial reçu

Radial a.

Principal artery of thumb

Right Lower Limb Images

Ulnar recurrent a.

Ulnar a.

Deep volar arch a.

. Superficial volar arch a.

Digital a.

Figure 15.49

The main arteries to the shoulder and upper limb.

Ulnar recurrent a.

Ulnar a.

Deep volar arch a.

. Superficial volar arch a.

Digital a.

Figure 15.49

The main arteries to the shoulder and upper limb.

external genitalia. Figure 15.51 shows important branches of this vessel, including the following:

1. Iliolumbar artery to the ilium and muscles of the back.

2. Superior and inferior gluteal arteries to the gluteal muscles, pelvic muscles, and skin of the buttocks.

3. Internal pudendal artery to muscles in the distal portion of the alimentary canal, the external genitalia, and the hip joint.

4. Superior and inferior vesical arteries to the urinary bladder. In males, these vessels also supply the seminal vesicles and the prostate gland.

5. Middle rectal artery to the rectum.

6. Uterine artery to the uterus and vagina.

The external iliac artery provides the main blood supply to the lower limbs (fig. 15.52). It passes downward along the brim of the pelvis and gives off two large branches—an inferior epigastric artery and a deep circumflex iliac artery. These vessels supply the muscles and skin in the lower abdominal wall. Midway between the symphysis pubis and the anterior superior iliac spine of the ilium, the external iliac artery becomes the femoral artery.

The femoral artery, which passes fairly close to the anterior surface of the upper thigh, gives off many

Internal intercostal m.

External intercostal m.

Figure 15.50

Arteries that supply the thoracic wall.

Internal intercostal m.

External intercostal m.

Intercostal Arteries

Thoracic aorta

Anterior intercostal a.

Thoracic aorta

Sternum

Anterior intercostal a.

Shier-Butler-Lewis: I IV. Transport I 15. Cardiovascular System I I © The McGraw-Hill

Human Anatomy and Companies, 2001

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Responses

  • ubaldo
    What vessel provides the arterial supply to upper limb internal thoracic?
    5 years ago

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