Additional Resources

For additional information about data collected and information systems used by governmental public health, consult the following resources:

• The National Syndromic Surveillance Conference (www. syndromic.org). Provides selected information about syn-dromic surveillance.

• Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (http://www.cdc.gov/ mmwr/). Provides weekly summaries of notifiable diseases by disease and state.

• Epi-X (http://www.cdc.gov/epix/). A CDC Web site with purpose of providing rapid access to health information. Sign up to receive daily notifications.

• Association Public Health Laboratories (http://www.aphl.org/ about_aphl/). Provides information about recent development, publications, and trainings related to public health laboratories.

• The Association of State and Territorial Health Officers (http://www.astho.org/). An organization that formulates and influences sound public health policy, as well as assists state health departments in the development and implementation of programs and policies to promote health and prevent disease.

• The Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (http://www.cste.org/). A group responsible for deciding which diseases should be reported nationally. It focuses on epidemiology and surveillance.

• The National Association for Public Health Statistics and Information Systems (http://www.naphsis.org). Provides a forum for the study, discussion, and solution of problems related public health information systems that integrate vital records registration, public health statistics, and other health information.

• The Metropolitan Medical Response System (https:// www.mmrs.fema.gov/Main/About.aspx). Provides information about the development and enhancement of existing emergency preparedness systems. It is targeted to first responders.

• The CDC Cities Readiness Project (http://www.bt.cdc.gov/ cri/facts.asp). Addresses the delivery of medications and medical supplies during a public health emergency.

• The University of Miami Ethics Program (http://privacy. med.miami.edu). Offers information about privacy and security issues for health data .

The following resources examine disease surveillance and information systems:

• Guegan,Y.N., Martin, E.,Ward, E.,Yasnoff,W., and Ripp L., eds. (2002). Public Health Informatics and Information Systems. New York: Springer-Verlag.

• Teutsch, S.M. and Churchill, R.E., ed. (2000). Principles and Practice of Public Health Surveillance. New York: Oxford University Press.

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